GOLDEN? MAYBE OLDIES? GIVE US A BREAK; AWARDS CELEBRATE STARS OF A CERTAIN AGE; No 20–somethings Up for Globe

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), January 12, 2014 | Go to article overview

GOLDEN? MAYBE OLDIES? GIVE US A BREAK; AWARDS CELEBRATE STARS OF A CERTAIN AGE; No 20–somethings Up for Globe


Byline: Lynn McPherson

It looks like a vintage year for film stars as the Golden Globes kick–off the awards season tonight.

The youngest of the f ive nominees for Best Actress in a Motion Picture Drama is Brit mum–of–three Kate Winslet, 38, followed by Cate Blanchett, 44, Sandra Bullock, 49, Emma Thompson, 54, and 79 –yea r – old Judi Dench.

The women – nominated for Labor Day, Blue J a s m i n e , Gravity, Saving Mr Banks and P h i l om e n a respectively – are all previous winners of Globes and Oscars and have an average age of 52.

Cate comes to the ceremony fresh from success at Australia's AACTA film and television awards in LA where she scooped Best International Actress for her performance in Woody Allen's f i lm about a wealthy Manhattan socialite who falls into poverty. She said: "Of course, it was such an honour to work with Woody Allen.

"But the character of Jasmine is full of complexities and playing those types of roles is what I love doing."

Meryl Streep, 64, is also nominated for her 28th Golden Globe in the Best Actress – Comedy or Musical category for August: Osage County. And of the 15 nominees in the best supporting actress category just one – Jessica Lawrence – is still in her 20s.

She is up against stars such as 46–year–old Julia Roberts and the oldest nominee, 89–year–old June Squibb, for her c omi c r o l e i n Nebraska.

Accepting a Best Actress award for playing Mary Poppins creator PL Travers in Saving Mr Banks at the Nat ional Board of Review Awards Gala in LA last week, Emma Thompson celebrated the older focus.

She said: "Normally on occasions like this I like to complain, loudly and at length, about the dearth of roles for women, but this year they seem to have behaved like buses in London, where you wait for hours for the right one, then suddenly 17 come along at once.

"And so it has been. You know, Meryl and Julia and Octavia and the Kates, both Blanchett and Winslet, it's been an extraordinary year for women's roles."

But behind the camera things have yet to change with the Best Director category still an all male domain. …

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