NO MORE VIOLENCE: DUGGAN FAMILY'S APPEAL; RIOT POLICE ON ALERT IN LONDON AFTER LAWFUL KILLING VERDICT; Cameron: Death Is Matter of Regret but We Must Respect Judicial Process

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 9, 2014 | Go to article overview

NO MORE VIOLENCE: DUGGAN FAMILY'S APPEAL; RIOT POLICE ON ALERT IN LONDON AFTER LAWFUL KILLING VERDICT; Cameron: Death Is Matter of Regret but We Must Respect Judicial Process


Byline: Justin Davenport, David Churchill and Joe Murphy

THE family of Mark Duggan today appealed for calm in London after the jury at his inquest ruled he had been lawfully killed by police.

His aunt Carole Duggan vowed that the relatives' struggle for justice would continue but urged: "No more demonstrations, no more violence." She spoke out as hundreds of riot police were on stand-by amid fears of fresh disorder after violent scenes outside the Royal Courts of Justice following the inquest there.

The jury yesterday ruled Mr Duggan, a prominent gang member, was not holding a gun when an officer shot him dead in August 2011.

Today both David Cameron and Met chief Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe led the official pleas for calm. Carole Duggan, speaking on BBC's Today, denied her comments outside the High Court yesterday -- in which she cried out "no justice, no peace" -- were intended to inflame disorder.

She said the words were merely a slogan used "by lots of people who have lost somebody within their family in unjust ways. So it's just one thing we say in response to our struggle really."

But she added: "We will not give peace to the authorities until we get justice. This has got to be dealt with in the right way through the courts. No more demonstrations, no more violence. "We'll have to fight this struggle, we'll go through this struggle peacefully."

Mr Duggan, 29, whose death sparked protests that exploded into riots and looting across Britain, was shot when police stopped the taxi in which he was travelling in Tottenham.

After a four-month inquest, the jury found that although he had a gun in the cab, he most likely threw it on to a grass verge as the car came to a stop.

Friends and family reacted with fury at the finding, some shouting abuse at the jury of seven women and three men as they left the court.

Mr Cameron today called on people to "respect judicial processes" after the stormy reactions. He told BBC London the death was "a matter of great regret" but called for respect for the courts.

The Prime Minister added: "I very much respect Mark Duggan's aunt for saying they want to pursue their case through the courts rather than on the streets. …

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NO MORE VIOLENCE: DUGGAN FAMILY'S APPEAL; RIOT POLICE ON ALERT IN LONDON AFTER LAWFUL KILLING VERDICT; Cameron: Death Is Matter of Regret but We Must Respect Judicial Process
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