In Praise of the Poet; He's Influenced Everyone from Bob Dylan to Terry Jones and Just like the Man Himself, Those Who Love Him Speak Eloquently and in Their Own Inimitable Style about His Life and Work. Here's What Some of His Famous Fans Have to Say about You-Know-Who

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

In Praise of the Poet; He's Influenced Everyone from Bob Dylan to Terry Jones and Just like the Man Himself, Those Who Love Him Speak Eloquently and in Their Own Inimitable Style about His Life and Work. Here's What Some of His Famous Fans Have to Say about You-Know-Who


Hannah Ellis, granddaughter of Dylan DYLAN Thomas has been there my whole life. The paintings on the wall, the books on the shelves, the name ever present in everyday discussions. But he was also there in my mum's hazel eyes, my uncle's intelligence and perfect wit, not to mention the ever increasing horror stories about visits to the dentist, always blaming dad and the 'Thomas' teeth. He's still there when I see my snub nose and uncompromising, rebellious curly hair and as I hear my son read, playing with words using a natural and innate gift. The cheeky personality is still about too! So what does Dylan mean to me? He's the talented wordsmith. A man I want the world to remember, but also, just simply, he's my granddad.

Matthew Rhys, actor 'A RATHER obvious choice for a Welshman,' the man said. I froze cold. My first audition for RADA. Cavernous room. I'd told him I was to recite some Dylan Thomas, the man who'd introduced me to words. Up until that first anthology I bought, words had been but for communication and swearing. Here was someone who could communicate with such balletic economy it made me want to swear. 'Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, Do not go gentle into that good night.' Is that 'obvious' I thought to myself...

Griff Rhys Jones, writer and presenter IF you wonder why Bob Dylan is called Bob Dylan, it's because of the impact that this Bohemian poet, this sort of proto-Beat, hip, cool poet, had on the artistic scene in New York in the early '50s and that story of his impact and the fact that, as Caitlin said, he went there to be idle and to fornicate, that story is extraordinary. It's amazing how feted he was and how misbehaved he was, what a naughty boy he was.

Thomas in a tweet We challenged Dylan fans to sum up their appreciation in 140 characters - which wasn't enough room for some...

Terry Jones, comedian and Python Dylan Thomas was first and foremost a poet - an inventor of words - a constructor of otherwise grammar. He was a magician.

Roger McGough, poet and broadcaster He fell in love with words as a child Language-guzzler, dazzling, wild. Crazily obscure, lyrical yet tough To describe the magic, one hundred and forty characters is not enou Gillian Clarke, National Poet of Wales Most books made things up, but A Child's Christmas in Wales was real life, where grown ups behaved like grown ups, and children thought like me.

Cerys Matthews, singer and broadcaster 'The world is a better place once a good poem has been added to it' Dylan Thomas. It could be about any cultural activity, and I love the quote Owen Sheers, poet and author A poet who reminded us of the art form's musical roots, a craftsman killed by the success of his voice, a lover of words with a fear of time.

Karl Jenkins, musician and composer SINCE I first encountered Under Milk Wood whilst a pupil at Gowerton Grammar School, Dylan Thomas has been ever present in my life, right up to the present day as I am currently writing a new musical commission entitled 'Llareggub'.

Catrin Finch, harpist and composer DYLAN Thomas' name became more respected in America than in Wales, and his controversial lifestyle and drunken opinions meant that he was revered and hated to equal measure. However, he stands the test of time, and 100 years on his work is as much a cornerstone of popular culture as artists such as John Lennon, Paul McCartney or the Rolling Stones are. …

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In Praise of the Poet; He's Influenced Everyone from Bob Dylan to Terry Jones and Just like the Man Himself, Those Who Love Him Speak Eloquently and in Their Own Inimitable Style about His Life and Work. Here's What Some of His Famous Fans Have to Say about You-Know-Who
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