Ukraine Borrows Georgia's Murderous Playbook; Obama and Putin Must Prevent a Repeat of Civil War

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 5, 2014 | Go to article overview

Ukraine Borrows Georgia's Murderous Playbook; Obama and Putin Must Prevent a Repeat of Civil War


Byline: Tsotne Bakuria

Twenty-three years ago, Ukraine won its independence from the Soviet Union. I was a student, a 20-year-old idealist, in the country of Georgia, looking forward to our own freedoms.

But in 1991, my country was almost destroyed by a disastrous civil war that raged for three years, killing innocent civilians and leaving deep wounds -- and an even deeper divide -- among those who survived.

I am reminded of this when I witness demonstrators in Kiev as protesters continue to take to the streets and blood has already been shed. Violence leads to more violence. Tyranny falls only when a country is united, not divided.

The civil war in Georgia began in much the same way. Georgia's first freely elected president was Zviad Gamsakhurdia, a mild-mannered intellectual. He was faced with serious economic and political challenges with regard to Georgia's relations with the Soviet Union.

Ethnic tensions erupted in the region of South Ossetia, and the new government blamed agents of the Kremlin for the unrest. Opposition grew fierce, and the new president was accused of dictatorial behavior and human rights violations -- charges that threatened international recognition of the new democracy.

Demonstrators took to the streets in Tbilisi that year, with mass arrests, political offices ransacked and opposition newspapers shuttered.

Barricades were erected, and demonstrations continued for the next three months. A state of emergency was declared. On Oct. 4, anti-government groups attacked the supporters of Gamsakhurdia; one supporter of the president was killed.

In December, the rebels, who by then controlled most of the capital, attacked the parliament building. Anti-government forces fired on pro-government crowds, killing or wounding 113 citizens.

On Jan. 6, 1992, Gamsakhurdia fled the country and remained in exile before his mysterious death in 1993 by a single bullet to the brain.

For the next decade, Georgia would suffer near fatal blows to the economic and social order.

The new president, Eduard Shevardnadze, would himself be overthrown in the 2004 Rose Revolution.

Now comes Ukraine.

Without international intervention, the deeply divided country could slide into a civil war -- possibly more disastrous than Georgia's. …

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Ukraine Borrows Georgia's Murderous Playbook; Obama and Putin Must Prevent a Repeat of Civil War
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