Do Guns, Pot Mix? Proposed Rules for Medical Marijuana Would Prohibit Firearm Ownership

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 6, 2014 | Go to article overview

Do Guns, Pot Mix? Proposed Rules for Medical Marijuana Would Prohibit Firearm Ownership


Byline: Associated Press Associated Press

Guns and marijuana don't mix, according to federal authorities, even if the gun is a legally held firearm and the drug is recommended by a doctor.

That interpretation of federal law is turning up in Illinois' draft medical marijuana regulations to the frustration of patients and caregivers.

As the state launches its first medical cannabis program, firearms ownership is overshadowing other issues such as the $150 proposed annual fee for patients and how new medical conditions would be added to an approved-for-use list.

"People aren't yelling at me about the $150. They're yelling at me about this issue," said Chris Lindsey, legislative analyst for the Marijuana Policy Project, a national group that supports legally regulated marijuana.

Lindsey said he believes it's the first time a state agency anywhere in the country "has pointed to a state law and decided that patients may not be able to possess a firearm." And Karmen Hanson, medical marijuana policy expert for the National Conference of State Legislatures, said she's not aware of any state laws that address firearms ownership among medical marijuana patients or their caregivers.

Some Illinois patients will continue to use marijuana illegally rather than give up their guns, said Julie Falco of Chicago, who speaks openly about how she has used cannabis to control her pain from multiple sclerosis.

Brian Hilton of Arlington Heights is one of them. He's a gun owner who wants to use marijuana legally to control pain from a spinal cord injury, but he's reconsidering applying for a medical marijuana card.

"I would be forced to surrender my gun rights, and that would put my family at great risk," said Hilton. "I would rather keep my weapons and stay underground."

The dispute centers on 93 words out of 48 pages of rules proposed by the Illinois Department of Public Health. The wording, in effect, advises gun owners they'll be in violation of state and federal law if they're approved for a medical marijuana card and don't give up their firearms. It says gun owners who obtain medical marijuana cards "may be subject to administrative proceedings by the Illinois State Police if they do not voluntarily surrender" their firearms owners ID cards or concealed carry permits. …

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