Growing Roses in Containers

Sunset, January 1985 | Go to article overview

Growing Roses in Containers


Growing roses in containers

Now's the time to start. Most of all, think about container size, soil mix, how you'll feed and water

Why bother growing roses in pots? Heavy, unworkable soil like Claudia Brotherton has in her San Diego garden is one good reason. Containers allow her to grow roses that she couldn't grow otherwise. More than 150 plants--miniatures, polyanthas, floribundas, hybrid teas, and grandifloras --thrive in her containers; one has syayed in the same pot for four years.

The photographs above show how Mrs. Brotherton prepares and plants bare-root roses. If you'd like to try her method, this is the time to plant.

Choose any favorite rose, or use the list at right to start. Smaller, more compact roses (miniatures, floribundas, polyanthas) are usually best if you're a beginner; they can also stay longer in containers.

Pot size and type. Before buying a container, consider the size, shape, and habit of the rose you intend to plant. For most of her roses, Mrs. Brotherton uses 18- to 20-inch Mexican clay pots. A typical 5-gallon plastic container (12 inches wide by 14 inches deep) is suitable for compact growers. Larger roses, such as tree roses, need bigger pots for proper proportion as well as for root space.

Wood has an advantage because it doesn't heat up on warm days. Half-barrels (23-inch inside diameter) provide plenty of root space for large roses, but they are heavy and awkward to move. Plastic containers keep moisture in longest.

Soil. Unamended garden soil rarely works well for growing roses in containers; roses prefer a faster-draining mix. You can buy packaged soil mix ($3 to $4 a cubic foot) or make your own (equal parts fine sand, peat moss, and fine fir bark make a good basic mix). Since the basic ingredients have little nutrient value, you'll need to add fertilizer right away if you make your own mix. Most packaged mixes include starter fertilizer.

Water. Mrs. Brotherton's roses are all watered by an automatic drip system. She uses spray-type emitters to wet the entire rootball. On hot summer days, she sets her system to come on twice a day for about 5 minutes each time; otherwise she waters needed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Growing Roses in Containers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.