Salute to the Haggis from Ouur Scottish Side; the Glamorgan Archives Offices in Leckwith, Cardiff, Are a Treasure Trove of Photos, Documents and Records Related to South Wales History. in the Third of a New Weekly Series Featuring This Resource, We Look at How Burns Night Was Celebrated in Cardiff

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), January 25, 2014 | Go to article overview

Salute to the Haggis from Ouur Scottish Side; the Glamorgan Archives Offices in Leckwith, Cardiff, Are a Treasure Trove of Photos, Documents and Records Related to South Wales History. in the Third of a New Weekly Series Featuring This Resource, We Look at How Burns Night Was Celebrated in Cardiff


Tonight, the birthday of Robert Burns, Scottish people across the world will be celebrating Burns Night, a chance to reconnect with their Scottish roots, recite classic verses from the great poet... and wash great helpings of haggis down with a few drams of whisky.

Here in Cardiff, festivities were traditionally organised by the Cardiff Caledonian Society, whose members would gather together for their annual Burns Night dinner.

The Cardiff Caledonian Society was founded in 1886.

Its aims were to promote social and friendly intercourse among Scotsmen resident in Cardiff and district, which included organising dinners and social gatherings; to aid deserving Scotsmen and their families who may stand in need of the influence and assistance of the Society, and to encourage educational schemes in Cardiff amongst persons of Scottish nationality.

The heyday period for the Society was during the 1920s and 1930s, when the influence of the Bute family - great historic landowners, of course, in the city, and the builders of Cardiff Castle - remained strong.

The records of the Cardiff Caledonian Society, held at Glamorgan Archives, include a series of programmes for Burns Night celebrations, an annual event in the Society's calendar.

The programme for the 1924 dinner, held at the Bute Salon in Cox's Restaurant, Cardiff, includes a traditional Scottish Bill O'Fare.

On the menu was Kail Broo, followed by The Haggis wi' Champit Tatties, A wee bit o' the Lammie's Mither wi' Red Curran Geelie, Tatties roastit or b'iled, an sproots.

For dessert? Rabbie's Ain Pudd'n, Tremlin Tam, App'l Tert or Fr'it Salad. And all topped off with Cups o' Cowfie. Quite the feast!

The Haggis was the highlight of the Bill O' Fare and would be piped in and addressed by one of the guests.

There were also, as you might expect, several toasts during the evening, including the traditional toast to the lassies, and their response.

Alongside the programmes are two "Scottish passports" issued to guests attending the Burns Night event and including the programme and menu for the evening.

The lassies who attended the celebrations were also presented with a ng a greeting and a souvenir containin song.

It was common p Prime Minister to ations, and the socie correspondence w Minister's Office. practice to invite the attend the celebraety's files include with the Prime In 1929 Ramsay invited, but politelwith the Five Powe Chequers. McDonald was ly refused as it clashed er Conference at Burns Night tele egrams were received by the Society from always congratulatsuccessful evening. CardiffCaledoni today, providing asstudents in CardiffScottish dancing e We hope that all wonderful Burns N m King George V, who ted them on a g. …

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Salute to the Haggis from Ouur Scottish Side; the Glamorgan Archives Offices in Leckwith, Cardiff, Are a Treasure Trove of Photos, Documents and Records Related to South Wales History. in the Third of a New Weekly Series Featuring This Resource, We Look at How Burns Night Was Celebrated in Cardiff
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