A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Oscars

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 2, 2014 | Go to article overview

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Oscars


Byline: Jake Coyle Associated Press By Jake Coyle Associated Press

This year's Academy Awards nominees reflect a Hollywood truism: The margin between the dust bin and the Oscar red carpet is often razor thin.

The development process of any film can be lengthy and arduous, full of challenges in obtaining financing or a studio executive's stamp of approval. The biggest obstacle on the road to the Academy Awards is, for many films, simply getting a green light.

That's especially true nowadays, when studios have pulled back on their output and turned their focus almost exclusively to blockbusters. It makes for an annual Oscar irony: When Hollywood gathers to celebrate itself at the Academy Awards tonight, it fetes not its standard business, but its oddities, its rarities, its freaks that somehow managed to squeeze through the cracks.

"The Wolf of Wall Street," for example, might seem like a no-brainer: Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio, loads of sex and drugs. But even "The Wolf," nominated for five Oscars including best picture, came very close to never getting made. After developing the film, Warner Bros. dropped it in 2008. Scorsese would later lament having "wasted about five months of my life" waiting for the Warner Bros.' OK that never came.

It wasn't until years later (and after other directors were considered) that the project came together, with independent film company Red Granite Pictures financing the film's $100 million budget, and Paramount Pictures distributing.

"It's actually kind of a miracle that this movie happened, especially the fact that we were allowed to keep the tone that we wanted all the way to the end," says DiCaprio. "When was the last time you saw a film like this happen? I don't know. It doesn't fit into any specific category or box. It's an epic. It's a giant Hollywood epic. It's almost like a film you'd have to make 30 or 40 years ago when directors had free rein."

The bet paid off not only in accolades, but at the box office. "The Wolf of Wall Street" has made more than $335 million.

The case of "Dallas Buyers Club" (six nominations, including best picture) is even more remarkable. A film that's now counted among the nine best of the year by the Academy took nearly two decades to get made. Co-producer and co-screenwriter Craig Borten first sold the script in 1996 after meeting and interviewing Ron Woodroof, a Texan who combated AIDS with drugs smuggled from other countries.

At one time, Woody Harrelson was attached to star with Dennis Hopper directing. Later, after the script was sold to Universal Pictures, Brad Pitt was lined up to play Woodroof, with Marc Forster directing. Another iteration brought in Ryan Gosling and director Craig Gillespie.

It was only revived with Matthew McConaughey (the best actor front-runner) and director Jean-Marc Vallee after the rights to the screenplay went dormant and Borten and co-producer Melisa Wallack were able to buy them back. And still, just weeks before filming began, investors pulled their money.

The breach was filled partly because McConaughey gave it an air of inevitability. He had already begun losing weight for the role and discussed it on TV talk shows. Made for just $5 million and shot in 25 days, "Dallas Buyers Club" finally got made, long after AIDS dwindled from the headlines. Specialty division Focus Features acquired the film, which has made $30.5 million worldwide.

Several of the Oscar nominees have relied on a single person to change their fate. When "12 Years a Slave" director Steve McQueen accepted the Golden Globe award for best drama, he thanked producer Brad Pitt: "Without you, this film would have never got made."

Similar kudos have gone to the young producer Megan Ellison, whose Annapurna Pictures bankrolled two best-picture nominees: David O. Russell's "American Hustle" (jointly with Sony Pictures) and Spike Jonze's "Her" (released by Warner Bros. …

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