Military Leadership and Counterinsurgency: The British Army and Small War Strategy since World War II

By Roe, Andrew M. | Military Review, January-February 2014 | Go to article overview

Military Leadership and Counterinsurgency: The British Army and Small War Strategy since World War II


Roe, Andrew M., Military Review


MILITARY LEADERSHIP AND COUNTERINSURGENCY: The British Army and Small War Strategy Since World War II, Victoria Nolan, I.B. Tauris & Co. Ltd., New York, 306 pages, $105.00

VICTORIA NOLAN'S ENGAGING Military Leadership and Counterinsurgency will not disappoint students of British small wars and counterinsurgency.

Nolan, a project manager at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex, United Kingdom, shrewdly employs organizational culture and modern-day leadership practices from the world of business to take a fresh look at the role campaign commanders played in the process of organizational adaptation and the evolution of the British army's distinctive approach between 1948 and 1960. The so-called British approach, based on a legacy of imperial policing but established during the period of decolonization following World War II, was built on four interconnected pillars: political primacy, close coordination of the civil-military-police triumvirate, the minimum use of force, and social and economic development. However, the glue that commonly bound this approach together, and the core of Nolan's innovative study, is the central role of military leadership in counterinsurgency.

Using three well-presented case studies--The Malayan Emergency (1948-1960), Kenya and the Mau Mau Uprising (1952-1956) and The Cyprus Revolt (1955-1960)--Nolan skillfully uncovers how military leaders influence organizational learning and the advancement of military organizational culture. In so doing, the book adds much to our understanding of events. She does this by examining three main questions. First, do military leaders transmit and embed organizational culture, and if so, how? Second, what are the qualities displayed by military leaders who are successful in transmitting and embedding culture, and how do these characteristics influence the evolution of the distinctive British approach to small wars? Finally, what conditions enable military leaders to be influential in the organizational learning process? Here, Nolan acknowledges upfront that support of senior leadership is essential to enable campaign commanders to embed small-war culture in military operations and practice.

Clearly portraying the significance of such leaders as Gen. Templer in Malaya, Gen. Erskine in Kenya, and Field Marshal Sir John Harding in Cyprus, Military Leadership and Counterinsurgency is divided into six well-written and thought-provoking chapters. Of note, "The Legacy of Imperial Policing," provides a much-needed chronological setting, covering the emergence of the British army as a small-war army in the Victorian era. The book is cleverly separated into a series of helpful sections and subsections; each is bite-size, succinct, and easily digestible. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Military Leadership and Counterinsurgency: The British Army and Small War Strategy since World War II
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.