Facebook Teens Grow Up in 'Cult of Self-Consciousness' Children Face Intolerable Online Pressures, Says Public School Head

Daily Mail (London), March 19, 2014 | Go to article overview

Facebook Teens Grow Up in 'Cult of Self-Consciousness' Children Face Intolerable Online Pressures, Says Public School Head


Byline: Laura Clark Education Correspondent

SOCIAL networking sites put children at greater risk of bullying and body image fears than ever before, a leading headmaster has warned.

Constant scrutiny on websites such as AskFM, Little Gossip, Facebook and Instagram leaves many teenagers feeling like 'the hopelessly inadequate stars of their own second-rate biopics', Andrew Halls said.

He said no previous generation endured so much attention from peers who 'adore, revile or all too publicly ignore on a moment-by-moment basis'.

Mr Halls, head of King's College School, Wimbledon, an PS18,900-ayear boys' day school, urged schools to instil 'grit' and emotional resilience in pupils to help them cope. Tomorrow, 200 independent school heads and teachers will attend a 'True Grit' conference on resilience training at his school.

Mr Halls said anonymous chat sites such as AskFM and Little Gossip left children 'vulnerable to cruel and absurd slanders that, for some, can be literally life-ending'.

Teens live the 'tortured drama of their adolescence under the scrutiny of hundreds or even thousands of others', he said, adding: 'Social networking sites require every 21st-century teenager to live his or her life under the eye of an electronic adjudicator far more cruel and censorious than any examiner, school teacher, or parent.

'No previous generation has spent so long online, "liking" and being "liked", or devastatingly ignored, in the OCD world of never-ending updates, status change, Instagram, AskFM, Little Gossip and Facebook. No wonder that every teenager can feel like the hopelessly inadequate star of his own secondrate biopic.' Girls and boys of all backgrounds are affected due to the 'democracy of the internet', argued Mr Halls.

He said some independent schools were 'woefully reluctant' to discuss mental health issues, which affect one in ten young people.

He added: 'Girls from aspirational families are the fastest-growing group using mental health services, as they strive to achieve more and more impossibly brilliant results.

'We know that boys and young men are much more affected by body image pressures than was the case 20 years ago. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Facebook Teens Grow Up in 'Cult of Self-Consciousness' Children Face Intolerable Online Pressures, Says Public School Head
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.