Sun-Fr1nged Beams

By Robert, Ellrodt | Modern Age, Winter 2014 | Go to article overview

Sun-Fr1nged Beams


Robert, Ellrodt, Modern Age


Sun-fringed beams, masking the glare of day, Dance tremulously in a light haze Before my half-closed eyelids, as I dream, Reclining under this aged tree. So Marvell once allowed his thoughts To rise and peer into the skies In search of heavenly bliss. But I, content with a lesser blessing, Seek only to bring my mind To an equable standstill, Contrasting cares and joys In life's close-meshed woof.  To ponder on a chequered life Is easiest in a chequered shade: A balance is best achieved Between the dark and brighter hours. Still patches of green enhance In the moving foliage the radiance Of flight-inviting holes of light. Under this firm, fast-anchored trunk, Dark roots in the dank earth are sunk,  Yet, from the core of being, bring forth This lavish play of sun and shade Greeted by my conscious mind. Beyond this all-enclosing green I can surmise a wide expanse Of illimitable light and life, And yet I would abide a while In this multitudinous world, And feed on its variety My ever-changing mild desires. MUSIC AND TIME  Music, creating its own time, Substitutes for the dull drift of life Its ever-changing, ever-echoing And never aimless chain of sounds. Common time doesn't begin or end: It stagnates, only progressing With human impulses and aims Which never reach a final goal. Fiat tempus followed on Fiat lux: In God's mind cosmic time was born. So in our present muddled state When the first note of an air sounds, It announces a new world's birth; Yet within the expanding sound Present is the prospect of death For, swift or slow, the notes are moving Toward their prescribed extinction, An inevitable final chord. … 

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