Camelot Was in Wigan! 'More Plausible Than Ever' Author Names This Street as Probable Site of the Court of King Arthur

Daily Mail (London), March 27, 2014 | Go to article overview

Camelot Was in Wigan! 'More Plausible Than Ever' Author Names This Street as Probable Site of the Court of King Arthur


Byline: Jaya Narain

RESIDENTS of Brookfield Road have never viewed their neighbourhood as anything other than the nondescript village cul-de-sac that it is.

The idea that those mundane redbrick terrace homes were touched by legend might have raised a northern chuckle or two.

But that was the reality villagers were coming to terms with last night after a historian declared the street, in Standish, near Wigan, is the most likely location of Camelot, the mythical court of King Arthur.

Where homeowners now park their cars and leave wheelie bins out for collection, it is said the Knights of the Round Table once gathered at the great castle.

The claims have been made by Graham Robb, who carried out extensive geographical research in preparation for a book.

He says ancient Celts built their major towns and settlements along straight lines calculated by the rising and the setting of the sun.

All royal courts had to have good road links and Mr Robb theorises the present location of Brookfield Road was a very 'significant' spot.

In his work, The Ancient Paths: Discovering the Lost Map of Celtic Europe, he suggests it was the meeting place of two major Celtic pathways.

Geographical evidence of the two ancient routes made this location a prominent one in medieval Britain, he claims.

If legend is to be believed, King Arthur and his Court were the rulers of Britain in the late 5th and early 6th centuries.

According to histories and romances, the heroic monarch led the defence of Britain against wave after wave of Saxon invaders.

The locality is not completely new to Arthurian links. The nearby beauty spot of Martin Mere, the largest freshwater lake in England, has long been claimed to be the water in which the famous Arthurian sword, Excalibur, was thrown by Sir Lancelot. A Camelot theme park was opened a few miles away in 1983 aiming to make the most of the legend but it closed in 2012. …

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