China, Japan Square Up over Africa

By Versi, Anver | African Business, February 2014 | Go to article overview

China, Japan Square Up over Africa


Versi, Anver, African Business


Will China and Japan come to blows over Africa? When I visited the TICAD V conference in Yokohama, Japan, last year, I and many of the 40 or so African heads of state who attended were pleasantly surprised when Japanese premier, Shinzo Abe, announced a $36bn package of aid and investments for Africa. He also promised to visit the continent, which would have the first time for a Japanese leader to do so in over eight years.

He also made very pleasant noises about how Africa could be a 'partner' in Japan's current campaign to return to vigorous growth. When he was asked the inevitable question of whether Japan's new thrust was to counter the massive Chinese influence in Africa, he dismissed the suggestion and implied that there was no possibility of a clash between the two.

Earlier this year while attending the Asian Financial Forum in Hong Kong, I noticed an increasing prickliness about Japan in the local media. One of the papers, the China Daily, carried a cartoon showing Abe 'rewriting history', having bound and gagged a figure representing 'history'. The tone of the cartoon was meant to be insulting.

China and Japan have had serious fallings out in recent times over several issues. First came clashes over disputed islands in the East China sea; then China condemned Abe for visiting the Yasukuni shrine in Tokyo, which honours Japan's war dead and which the Chinese see as a symbol of Japanese aggression during World War II when Japan occupied parts of China and South Korea, followed by the Chinese ambassador in the UK comparing Japan to the evil Voldemort from the Harry Potter series for what he describes as an unacceptably aggressive attitude following Abe's decision to re-militarise his country.

But the sparks really began to fly during Abe's visit to three African countries: Ethiopia, Cote d'Ivoire and Mozambique. China has of course poured billions of dollars into Africa and trade with Africa reached $180bn in 2012. China sees Africa as a vital component of its growth strategy, both for resources as well as a burgeoning new market. Its influence in the continent is now greater than that of any other foreign entity, including the West. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

China, Japan Square Up over Africa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.