Covering a Lot of Ground! CFO's Spare Time Is Spent on Three Very Different Tracks

By Bray, Ashley | ABA Banking Journal, March 2014 | Go to article overview

Covering a Lot of Ground! CFO's Spare Time Is Spent on Three Very Different Tracks


Bray, Ashley, ABA Banking Journal


Deb Evans knows how to travel in style. The CFO of 8334.1 million-assets Bank of Lancaster in Kilmarnock, Va., has two types of horsepower and even steam power in her repertoire. With a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from General Motors Institute (now Kettering University), her love for all rides should come as no surprise.

Most recently, Evans purchased a 2008 Z51 Corvette. When she brought the new car home on April Fools' Day, it wasn't a joke, and it fulfilled a long-held childhood dream that was first kindled by working on cars with her father. "The reason I got interested in Corvettes and cars was my father had a 1939 Ford that he had hopped up for street racing." He put in a Corvette engine and did some things to the suspension, says Evans. "He and I rebuilt that engine when I was in high school."

The 436-hp Corvette is her everyday driver and has 52,000 miles on it. "I figure there's no point in having one if you just leave it in the garage," she says. "It's meant to be driven."

At least once a year, she takes it to a high-performance driving event at Virginia International Raceway. The two-day event splits time evenly between the classroom and four daily sessions on the track with an instructor. "It's really a school to learn how to drive fast. It's a blast," says Evans. "And it eliminates the need to do it on the street if you can do it on the track."

Evans also finds herself riding around a different type of track a few times a year as a member of several live steam train clubs--another interest she inherited from her father. Back in the early '70s, he bought a partially built l/8th scale steam locomotive and completed it himself. …

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