Hoofing It Away from Beef

By Jacobson, Mike F. | Nutrition Action Healthletter, April 2014 | Go to article overview

Hoofing It Away from Beef


Jacobson, Mike F., Nutrition Action Healthletter


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Deciding between steak and chicken tonight? Corn-fed beef is by far the worse choice, not just for you, but for the environment and for the welfare of the animals.

* Health. Most cattle end up in feedlots, where high-calorie grains fatten them up quickly. The extra fat eventually zeroes in on human arteries. And red meat--especially hot dogs, sausages, and other processed meats--promotes colon cancer.

* Environment. Whether cattle live out on the range or in feedlots, they emit methane gas, a potent cause of global warming. What's more, growing the corn and soybeans for feed requires huge amounts of fertilizer, pesticides, water, and fossil fuel. Then there's the stench from the manure at feedlots (which are called "concentrated animal feeding operations," or CAFOs), which can sicken nearby residents.

* Animal welfare. The grain fed to animals in feedlots can cause digestive, hoof, and liver diseases and may necessitate the continuous use of antibiotics. That can trigger the growth of antibiotic-resistant pathogens that can infect humans.

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The good news: the number of cattle has dropped to its lowest level--about 89 million head in 2012--since 1952, when our population was half what it is now. The average American consumed 42 pounds of beef in 2011, down more than a third since the mid-1970s. Americans now eat a third more poultry than beef.

The decline is partly due to drought in the Midwest and the Plains states that has scorched pasturelands and forced cattle ranchers to cut their herds. What's more, federal laws requiring corn farms to use some of their crop for ethanol have boosted prices of corn and meat. …

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Hoofing It Away from Beef
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