Understanding Sexual Identity Development of African American Male College Students

By Randolph, Schenita D.; Kim, Mimi M. et al. | Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality, Annual 2013 | Go to article overview

Understanding Sexual Identity Development of African American Male College Students


Randolph, Schenita D., Kim, Mimi M., Golin, Carol, Matthews, Derrick D., Howard, Daniel L., Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality


Introduction

African Americans face the most severe burden of HIV among other racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Despite representing only 14% of the US population in 2009, African Americans accounted for 44% of all new HIV infections in that year (Center for Disease Control, 2011). While the overall incidence of HIV in the US did not change significantly from 2006-2009, there was a 21% increase in people 13-29 years of age and a 34% increase in men who have sex with men. Among the 13-29 age groups, only MSM experienced an increase, and among MSM aged 13-29, there was a significantly greater increase among African American MSM. Overall, there was a 48% increase in African-American men who have sex with men (Prejean, Song, Hernandex, Ziebell, Green & Walker, 2011).

Furthermore, in 2009, 57% of the 11,200 new HIV infections among women occurred in African American women and the vast majority (80%) of the new cases were due to heterosexual transmission (Prejean, et al., 2011). Research has suggested that there are some African-American men who do not self-identify as gay or bisexual, but do in fact have sex with both men and women (Millet, Malebranche, Mason & Spikes, 2005). This phenomenon may be one explanation for the increased rates of HIV transmission to African- American women (Millet,et al., 2005). Black men appear more likely to be behaviorally bisexual than men of other racial groups (Montgomery, Mokotoff, Gentry & Blair, 2003). However, despite attention to this phenomenon of African American males, there is no empirical evidence that this is uniquely African American or responsible for increased HIV infection among African Americans (Millet, et al., 2005; Bond, Wheeler, Millett, LaPollo, Carson & Liau, 2009).

Male African-American college students are at particularly high risk for HIV infection. Between 2000 and 2003, 11% of men ages 18-30 years who were newly infected were enrolled in college at the time of their diagnosis, and 87% of those college students were African American (Hightow, MacDonald, Pilcher, Kaplan, Foust, Nguyen & Leone, 2005). An examination of HIV transmission among men ages 18-30 years in North Carolina found that 15% of the men reported sexual contact with both men and women in the year prior to their diagnosis. Bisexual men were more likely than men who exclusively had sex with men to be African American and enrolled in college (Hightow, Leone, MacDonald, McCoy, Sampson & Kaplan, 2006).

Although all men and women, regardless of sexual orientation, race and ethnicity have a process for sexual identity, this study focuses on African Americans because they are disproportionately affected by the disease and it is essential to implement culturally appropriate interventions to address this disparity. It is important to understand African American men's sexuality and views of homosexuality in order to implement the best strategies that will assist them in protecting themselves and their partners. Therefore, a first step in addressing the spread of HIV in African American college students is to gain insight into African American male sexuality and sexual identity development. Such information could shed light on the factors that drive sexual risk behaviors among young, college-aged African-American men. Research on the sexual experiences of African-American men, however, has typically focused primarily on their behaviors; little work has been done to understand how these men develop their sexual identities (Wyatt, Williams & Myers, 2008). Furthermore, most of the work on the sexuality of African-American men has ignored heterogeneity, developmental change, and the context in which sexual behaviors occur (Lewis & Kertzner, 2002).

Finally, little research has been done with African-American college men despite the importance of understanding the context of their sexual behaviors (Hightow, et al., 2006).

Method

To gain insight into the role that sexual identity may play in the lives of African-American men, we interviewed African-American male college students in a historically Black college and university (HBCU) located in the central Piedmont region of North Carolina in one of the largest cities in the state. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Understanding Sexual Identity Development of African American Male College Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.