Employers Are Now Providing Analytical Skills Training: Many Companies Plan to Build Employee's Analytical Skills through Mentoring

By Castellano, Stephanie | Talent Development, April 2014 | Go to article overview

Employers Are Now Providing Analytical Skills Training: Many Companies Plan to Build Employee's Analytical Skills through Mentoring


Castellano, Stephanie, Talent Development


Data scientists are in high demand, yet rare. So, instead of courting the few that are out there, many companies in need of analytical talent are standing by the old principle "Love the one you're with."

In a recent survey by the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp), 47 percent of organizations indicated that they intend to train current staff on analytical skills. Only 17 percent indicated that they would mostly hire analytics staff. Twenty-six percent say they already have the talent they need.

"Training for analytical abilities is most often focused on learning why, not how," write the authors of The Age of Big Data: A Progress Report for Organizations and HR. Survey respondents rated critical thinking and problem solving as the two most important professional competencies, which suggests that analytical ability is a mind-set, not the mastery of a specific software or mathematical skill.

"Organizations seem to feel that specific analytical skills such as statistical computation methods, data mining, and data visualization are important, but they are also easily acquired or trainable," says Cliff Stevenson, senior human capital researcher at i4cp. …

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