Dedication

By Vickrey, Barry R.; Sargent, Clint et al. | South Dakota Law Review, Spring 2013 | Go to article overview

Dedication


Vickrey, Barry R., Sargent, Clint, Garry, Patrick M., Konenkamp, John K., South Dakota Law Review


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Volume 58 of the South Dakota Law Review is dedicated to a great man, teacher, and friend--Professor Randall J. Gingiss. Professor Gingiss teaches Trusts and Wills, Estate and Gift Tax, Estate Planning, Financial Analysis for Lawyers, and Property at the University of South Dakota School of Law. Unfortunately for USD law students, Professor Gingiss will be retiring in May of 2013. Recognizing his many contributions during his 17 years of teaching at the USD School of Law, the Editorial Board of the South Dakota Law Review is honored to dedicate this volume to Professor Gingiss.

Professor Gingiss graduated from Amherst College in 1966 and the University of Michigan School of Law in 1969. Following law school, Professor Gingiss served in the Judge Advocate General's Corps of the United States Navy from 1969 to 1974. In 1980, Professor Gingiss received an LL.M. in Taxation from DePaul University, and in 1991 received an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago.

Prior to coming to South Dakota, Professor Gingiss practiced estate planning in Chicago, Illinois for over 20 years. He is a former co-chair of the Marital Deduction Committee of the Real Property, Probate and Estate Law Section of the American Bar Association and is former chair of the Estate and Gift Tax Division of the Federal Taxation Committee of the Chicago Bar Association. Professor Gingiss is also a fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel.

Professor Gingiss has been a consistent advocate for the Estate Planning field in South Dakota. His influence has led many students to become successful practitioners in South Dakota, and beyond. In recognition of his teaching abilities, Professor Gingiss was awarded the John Wesley Jackson Award for outstanding law teacher in 2001. It is an honor and privilege to recognize Professor Gingiss again for his service and dedication to the law school and the legal community. The Editorial Board wishes Professor Gingiss the best, and extends a heartfelt "thank you" for the many lessons and laughs.

BARRY VICKREY ([dagger])

About once a year, for reasons I won't go into, I ask Randy Gingiss the same question: "What are the Yiddish words for my son's father-in-law and mother-in-law?" Each year, Randy reminds me that my son's father-inlaw is my "machuten" and his mother-in-law is my "makheteneste." In recent years, I have noticed that Randy adds the name of a standard Yiddish dictionary without saying, "You know, you could go look it up for yourself."

This annual ritual reminds me of some of the qualities that have made Professor Randy Gingiss such a valuable member of the USD Law School faculty.

First, Randy knows a lot about many interesting things. Yiddish is one of them. He also knows a lot, for example, about Civil War history and about coffee. More importantly for the Law School and our students, he knows a lot about the areas of law he teaches, most notably wills, trusts, and estate planning.

Randy's knowledge of the law includes both the theoretical and the practical. He understands the policies and principles that are the foundation of the law. But he also understands how the law is applied to real problems that clients encounter. He can teach not only why the law is what it is but also how to draft a document to accomplish a client's objectives. From talking with students, I know how much they appreciate his ability to translate theory into practice.

Second, our annual ritual reminds me how generous Randy is about sharing his knowledge. Just as he always has time for my trivial question, Randy always takes the time to assist people who have questions about the subjects within his expertise. When I am teaching future interests in Property law, I can always go to Randy to help me think about how to teach students this challenging area of the law. When students ask him questions, Randy is both patient and thorough. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dedication
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.