A League of Their Own; Researchers Discover Up to EIGHT Women's Football Teams in First World War Coventry

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), May 23, 2014 | Go to article overview

A League of Their Own; Researchers Discover Up to EIGHT Women's Football Teams in First World War Coventry


Byline: Ben Eccleston News reporter ben.eccleston@trinitymirror.com

RESEARCHERS have discovered up to eight women's football teams in Coventry who played during the chaos of the First World War.

e brains behind a project focusing on ladies who played the sport between 1914 and 1918 - which is being led by production company Metal Dog Media - are digging through the archives to nd old stories, photos and memories of sporty ladies in the city.

Metal Dog, based in Far Gosford Street, is putting together a documentary, exhibition and even trying to set up a reconstruction match to celebrate women's football from a century ago.

Among those working with them are Coventry City historian Lionel Bird and Mike Young, from the Coventry City Former Players Association, who have so far found teams such as the Rudge-Whitworth Factory Ladies Football Club and Humber Ladies who were formed in 1916/17.

At the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, women found themselves working in the city's munitions factories producing ri"e ammunition, shells, bombs and thousands of metal mess tins.

And it was here that many of the teams were formed, with others including Coventry Chain Ladies, Coventry Ordnance Ladies, Daimler Ladies, White & Poppe Ladies, Foleshill Ladies and Coventry City Ladies.

And even when the city's teams weren't playing themselves, Coventry was still involved in the very biggest games in the sport.

FRAN PORTER, a producer with Metal Dog Media, said: "One of the most well-known women's football clubs was e Dick Kerr Ladies Football Club, formed in Preston in 1917. As an indication of just how popular women's football was, February 1921 saw Dick Kerr Ladies FC play St Helen's at High-eld Road in front of 27,000 spectators. …

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