Artist Spot Light: 4 Artists Discuss Recent Works and Share Their Advice for New and Aspiring Artists

Art Business News, Spring 2014 | Go to article overview

Artist Spot Light: 4 Artists Discuss Recent Works and Share Their Advice for New and Aspiring Artists


Richard Tuschman

John-Mark Gleadow

Lisa Sanditz

Jono Dry

RICHARD TUSCHMAN

RICHARDTUSCHMAN.COM

Richard Tuschman has primarily worked as a commercial photographer, but it's the artist's recent Edward Hopper-inspired series, "Hopper Meditations," that has the art world buzzing these days.

"[The series] is a personal photographic response to the work of the American painter Edward Hopper," says Tuschman. "I have always loved the way Hopper's paintings, with an economy of means, are able to address the mysteries and complexities of the human condition. I like to think of my images as dramas for a small stage, with the figures as actors in a one or two character play."

To create this series, Tuschman first built, painted and photographed dollhouse-size dioramas. "A lot of the furniture is standard dollhouse furniture, but some I made myself," he says. Next he photographed the models against a plain backdrop, and then used Photoshop to digitally marry the images.

It's easy to mistake Tuschman's photographs for paintings themselves, which he says helps to create an emotional resonance with viewers. "Technology gives me a huge amount of control, and my background as a failed painter comes in very handy," he adds.

When asked about advice he would offer to an aspiring artist, Tuschman says simply: "There is a lot of truth to the quote, 'Luck is what happens when preparation intersects with opportunity.'"

Tuschman is now closing the book on his Hopper collection and hard at work on a new series of open-ended narratives inspired by recent trips to Krakow, Poland, where his wife was born.

LISA SANDITZ LISASANDITZ.COM

Through her art, Lisa Standitz explores the relationship between humans and the land we inhabit.

"As humans' relationship to the land gets more complicated, our sense of the significance of these places gets more and more problematic," says Standitz. "These new sculptures and paintings, as in my previous work, attempt to reconcile, through color, form, surface considerations and art historical traditions, the relationship between modern quotidian desires and their tragic, comic and complex impact on the American landscape."

Her oil and acrylic rural and commercial landscapes are both meticulously controlled and at the same time wildly unrestrained. Works like "Frit-O-Lay Factory" convey the irrationality of consumerism in food production, and withering Jack-O-Lanterns in "Rotting Halloween" depict parts of a large-scale composting field in New York.

Sanditz says she has been influenced by her grandmother, other painters and painting traditions, but mostly "hearing or reading stories about various types of developments in the built environment. …

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