Media in the Classroom: Video Comes of Age

By Decesare, Julie A. | American Libraries, May 2014 | Go to article overview

Media in the Classroom: Video Comes of Age


Decesare, Julie A., American Libraries


In the past 10 years, the quantity of digitized or born-digital media, especially video, has skyrocketed. Librarians are constantly navigating this digital shift and helping their patrons find their way through it.

Media is a complicated format for librarians: Issues involving fair use limitations and allowances, individual versus institutional rights, closed-circuit rights, public-performance rights, streaming rights, licensing details, and copyright and access questions are ever-present. Finding titles in a required format can also be problematic. The payoff comes in the many video resources available, both for free and through fees, that are ideal for library instruction, research, outreach, and use within the curriculum by way of content and learning management systems.

Instructors and researchers are demanding video. According to Ithaka S+R's US Faculty Survey 2012 (sr.ithaka.org), academic faculty rate audiovisual resources at the same level of research importance as reference materials. Always an engaging supplemental resource, video is also gaining prominence in primary scholarly research, especially as more special collections and archives digitize their him holdings.

The survey asked different departments how important him and video resources are to their research. Close to 40% of the humanities faculty responded that these materials were important; less than 20% of the social sciences faculty and only 10% of the sciences faculty answered affirmatively. When asked about the types of materials used in teaching and assignments for freshmen and sophomores, again the disciplines varied. Film, video, and other non-textual sources were used often or occasionally with lower-level undergraduates by close to 85% of humanities faculty; in the social sciences it was about 70%, and in the sciences about 35%.

The Pew Research Center's Online Video 2013 report (pewinternet. …

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