The Real North Beach: In San Francisco's Neighborhood of Poets, Thinkers, and Coffee Drinkers, Two Locals Show Us the Beat

By Sens, Josh | Sunset, May 2014 | Go to article overview

The Real North Beach: In San Francisco's Neighborhood of Poets, Thinkers, and Coffee Drinkers, Two Locals Show Us the Beat


Sens, Josh, Sunset


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Where's the heart of North Beach?

JERRY CIMINO: I do walking tours, and the first place we go is City Lights bookstore. In my mind, it's the best bookstore on the planet. There's a good chance you'll see owner-poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti there; he's in his 90s now and keeps a low profile. And even though he's grown the store in size over the years, the spirit is the same. It still feels radical. You want progressive, out-there books and magazines, you'll find them in City Lights.

A great coffee shop?

ANNA WEINBERG: I'm a fan of Caffe Roma. There are groups of Italian guys who have been meeting there every morning for coffee for decades. North Beach is kind of classic that way. You're not going to find any Blue Bottle here. Places like Roma, they still roast their own beans. Always have.

JC: And you can't forget Caffe Trieste. On any given day, you'll see writers and artists drinking coffee and working intently. The legend is that Francis Ford Coppola wrote a good chunk of the screenplay to The Godfather in Trieste. I'm not a fancy coffee person. I usually get a latte. They'll see me in line and have it ready for me. They might not know your full name, but that's the way North Beach is. You'll know someone as "that guy who always wears the funny shoes." Or the "lady in the big hat." 601 Vallejo St.; caffetrieste.com.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Neighborhood park?

JC: Right in the heart of North Beach is Washington Square Park. It's the community gathering place. You're guaranteed to see someone you know. You'll see the local cop, kids playing a beanbag game, elderly Chinese people doing tai chi. There's also a statue of Benjamin Franklin. No one seems to know why that's there.

AW: The park is in front of our restaurant, and I always think of it as an anchor for North Beach. It's small and usually crawling with people. There's an art festival in the park on Sundays where you can sometimes find eclectic stuff.

Your favorite neighborhood walk?

JC: You've got to climb the Filbert Steps, which lead all the way up to Coit Tower. There's a famous shot from the movie Dark Passage of Humphrey Bogart climbing those steps. So many movies have been shot in this area. But the views from the steps are what's really special. They look out over the bay, Treasure Island, and the Bay Bridge.

AW: I'll start from Washington Square Park, then head up to Coit Tower, and walk down the Filbert Steps on the other side. Beautiful views and homes to see, and you get some exercise along the way. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Real North Beach: In San Francisco's Neighborhood of Poets, Thinkers, and Coffee Drinkers, Two Locals Show Us the Beat
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.