From Pentecost to the Triune God

By Haughey, John C. | Theological Studies, June 2014 | Go to article overview

From Pentecost to the Triune God


Haughey, John C., Theological Studies


From Pentecost to the Triune God. By Steven M. Studebaker. Grand Rapids, Ml: Eerdmans, 2012. Pp x + 281. $34.

Studebaker, a Pentecostal Christian, believes he should not be satisfied to leave his personal experience of the Spirit and that of his fellow Pentecostals something to be quiet about but something to theologize about. And he does the latter well. His main interest is to articulate a trinitarian theology of the Spirit for his fellow Pentecostals. But he also hopes that his work will "reflect a tongue of the Spirit" for "the wider family of Christian theology."

His book is the sixth in a series entitled "The Pentecostal Manifestos" written by scholars who are connecting the longer tradition of theological scholarship with their own younger tradition. The whole series is evidence of a Pentecostal scholarship coming of age and contributing to older Christian traditions.

S. describes how much he has learned from Catholic theology, primarily at Marquette University where he wrote his dissertation under the direction of David Coffey. Where he differs from Coffey is interesting, and where he goes off on tangents of his own is even more interesting.

First, his connection with Coffey. It has to do with the entelechy or the basic orientation and drive of the Spirit. Both authors address the subject. Coffey sees it as christological. "The Spirit's orientation--entelechy--to the Son is primary in the Spirit's personal identity" (255). S. differs: "The motivating dynamism of the Spirit is not the Son but the communion of the Trinity. The Spirit's identity and work is always oriented to constituting the fullness of the triune God" (256). "The Spirit completes the economic work of redemption and the immanent fellowship of the Trinitarian God" (9). It is not clear to me how one of the divine Persons can be seen as constituting the fullness of the Trinity or completing the immanent fellowship of the trinitarian God. It seems that since the Trinity is constituted by three Persons, each completes the other two.

S. attributes his tension with the more classical tradition of trinitarian theology to his experience (and, by extension, to Pentecostalism's experience) of the Spirit. S.'s complaint with the usual manner of construing the Trinity through the processions leaves the Spirit too passive and derivative. The role given to the Father as well as the mutual love between Father and Son leaves the Spirit as an add-on rather than as "contributing to the constitution of their personal identities" or "completing" their immanent "fellowship. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

From Pentecost to the Triune God
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.