'Pohadka'

By Cowan, Rob | Gramophone, June 2014 | Go to article overview

'Pohadka'


Cowan, Rob, Gramophone


'Pohadka'

Dvorak Rondo, Op 94 B171. Silent Woods, Op 68 No 5 B173. Songs my mother taught me, Op 55 B104 No 4 Janacek Pohadka (Fairy Tale). Presto Mahler Kindertotenlieder (arr Derevianko). Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen--Ging' heut morgen ubers Feld. Riickert-Lieder-Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen

Suk Two Pieces, Op 3

David Geringas vc

Ian Fountain pf

Es-Dur [F] ES2045 (69' * DDD)

The principal draw here is David Geringas's reflective I and deeply affecting version of the third of Mahler's Ruckert-Lieder, 'Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen' (I am lost to the world), as inwardly probing a rendition as any involving the human voice, the sensitively spun cello implying every last vestige of withdrawn emotion implied in Ruckert's poem. A beautiful cello sound too, seamlessly bowed and velvet in texture, with perfectly judged support from pianist Ian Fountain. Geringas also plays the complete Kindertotenlieder in Viktor Derevianko's cello transcription, which doesn't work quite so well, principally because, unlike Songs on the Death of Children, 'Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen' weaves its magic with a mere prompt from just the title. Those opening words are really critical, and the music alone can do the rest. By contrast, Kindertotenlieder cries out for its text, excepting perhaps 'Oft denk' ich, sie sind nur ausgegangen' (I often think they have only just gone out ...), which, in purely musical terms, works well enough as an instrumental solo. So does 'Ging heut' morgen fibers Feld' (I went this morning over the field), understandably so, as it fits both its parent Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen and the first movement of the First Symphony that grew out of it. …

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