DIY Care for Cancer Patients; Cancer Patients to 'Self-Manage' Their Treatment

Daily Mail (London), June 16, 2014 | Go to article overview

DIY Care for Cancer Patients; Cancer Patients to 'Self-Manage' Their Treatment


CANCER patients will be forced to 'self-manage' their treatment under new cuts to health services.

Patients who have undergone treatment will be instructed to monitor changes in their condition instead of having routine hospital follow-ups with specialist staff.

Even dying patients being given palliative care will face the changes. They will have fewer hospital visits and be encouraged to 'self-manage' instead. The dramatic development has already been launched across the country and comes as rising numbers of Scots are diagnosed with the disease.

Last night patients' groups reacted with horror, warning that the real reason patients are being 'abandoned' is because of a lack of staff and hospital capacity.

Around 30,000 Scots patients are diagnosed with cancer every year and that number is likely to rise to almost 35,000 by 2020.

The Transforming Care After Treatment scheme is for those who have completed 'active' treatment such as chemotherapy or are having palliative care because they are dying.

Until now NHS practice has been to oversee patients with regular visits and follow-ups with specialists, such as consultants and nurses, to keep an eye on their progress and observe any changes in their condition which could be a sign the cancer is returning.

But the new scheme puts a firm emphasis on patients 'playing a more active role in managing their own care' after treatment if doctors believe they can, a trend known as 'self-management'.

Examples would include patients being given information about their health and warned about what to do if they notice any further problems.

There are also plans to offer patients more education and support from cancer nurses, to help them with issues such as general health and wellbeing and financial questions as well as to guide them to support groups.

They are backed by a leading cancer charity which insists the scheme is positive and will put people in 'control' of their health. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

DIY Care for Cancer Patients; Cancer Patients to 'Self-Manage' Their Treatment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.