Why Infrastructure Development Is Critical: Dr Ibrahim Mayaki, CEO of Nepad and Former Prime Minister of Niger, Writes on Why Infrastructure Growth Is Imperative to Africa's Economic Strengths

By Mayaki, Ibrahim | New African, May 2014 | Go to article overview

Why Infrastructure Development Is Critical: Dr Ibrahim Mayaki, CEO of Nepad and Former Prime Minister of Niger, Writes on Why Infrastructure Growth Is Imperative to Africa's Economic Strengths


Mayaki, Ibrahim, New African


THE STORY OF AFRICA'S development is changing. Six of the world's fastest-growing economies are in Africa. Democratic governance has been strengthened over the last five decades, enabling a platform for stable growth and prosperity in most parts of the continent.

The New Partnership for Africa's Development (Nepad) is happy to be part of this upward transformation process, through the implementation of its Programmes.

But while we boast of having some of the fastest growing economies, what we do not generally say is that we also have seven of the 10 most unequal economies.

If we look at the GINI coefficients (an index which measures the extent to which the distribution of income or consumption expenditure among individuals or households within an economy deviates from a perfectly equal distribution) Africa is the most unequal continent in the world.

Added to that specificity is the fact that 75% of Africa's population is under 25 years old. This growing youth population, most of which has access to modern and rapid communications systems, and requires instant results, could impact adversely on the African nation-state, if social inequality and the current systems of government are not revised.

Inclusive policies are an absolute prerequisite for political stability. By "inclusive" I mean creating jobs for the youth and facilitating access to public services.

The equation of the most unequal yet youngest continent is one that could result in an explosive situation.

Tunisia is an interesting model that failed. The North African country was praised for its good transport system, highest penetration of IT on the continent, good ports, relatively good airports, fairly good agricultural production, the highest literacy rate of girls ... but the country imploded.

Fundamentally, the majority of the population did not perceive the level of inclusion of the youth as satisfactory. This is why whatever we do in agriculture, infrastructure, ICT, if we do not resolve the key issue of inclusiveness, we are carrying very fragile systems that at one moment or another will implode. So, inclusiveness is really fundamental.

But for real development in every sphere to happen, we need to improve our infrastructure. At Nepad, we believe that infrastructural development is the turn-key to all aspects of social and economic transformation.

Antonio Estache and Gregoire Garsous, both experts in infrastructure investment in Africa, state in their paper The impact of infrastructure on growth in developing countries that there is, indeed, a plethora of anecdotal and more technical evidence that better quantity and quality of infrastructure can directly raise the productivity of human and physical capital and hence growth.

Despite the gains registered in improving regional infrastructure connectivity across the continent since the establishment of the African Union along with Nepad, Africa still faces serious infrastructure shortcomings across all sectors, both in terms of access and quality.

For instance, only 38% of the African population has access to electricity; the penetration rate for the internet is less than 10% while only a quarter of Africa's road network is paved. Studies have shown that poor road, rail and port facilities add 30% to 40% to the cost of goods traded among African countries, thus adversely affecting the private-sector development and the flow of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI).

Furthermore, a recent World Bank study found that the poor state of infrastructure in many parts of Africa reduced national economic growth by two percentage points every year and cut business productivity by as much as 40%, making Africa in spite of its enormous mineral and other natural resources - the region with the lowest productivity levels in the world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Why Infrastructure Development Is Critical: Dr Ibrahim Mayaki, CEO of Nepad and Former Prime Minister of Niger, Writes on Why Infrastructure Growth Is Imperative to Africa's Economic Strengths
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.