Where Did You Go for Your Holes? WEIRD AND WONDERFUL TOURIST ATTRACTIONS

The Mirror (London, England), June 28, 2014 | Go to article overview

Where Did You Go for Your Holes? WEIRD AND WONDERFUL TOURIST ATTRACTIONS


Byline: EMILY RETTER and HELEN WHITEHOUSE

WHEN a 60ft deep sinkhole opened up under a car museum things looked bad.

Eight valuable vehicles fell in at the National Corvette Museum in Kentucky, USA, and the damage totalled PS600,000.

But now visitor numbers have rocketed from 9,000 to 17,000 a month as the mangled mess draws in the curious. So much so that the museum has even thrown in two more cars.

But written-off roadsters are far from the oddest tourist attractions out there.

If you're fed up with days at the seaside or theme park, there's a whole world of weird attractions just waiting...

emily.retter@trinitymirror.com

TOPSY TURVY WORLD

This house in Shanghai was deliberately built upside-down with furniture stuck to the ceiling and the front door acting as an upstairs window. There are similar houses in Moscow, California, South Korea, Poland and Florida.

PALACE OF CORN

Originally built in 1892 so farmers in Mitchell, South Dakota, could display their harvest, the Corn Palace now draws in tourists with corn murals made up of 13 natural shades of the cereal. Complete with Eastern-style minarets, it now attracts 500,000 visitors a year and also hosts music shows and sports events.

CLONED VILLAGE

Hallstatt Alpine Village in China is a replica of a tourist village with the same name in Austria. Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery but Austria was unhappy, accusing China of sending tourists to act as spies. The Chinese have form in this area. The city of Chengdu has its own "British Town", modelled on Dorchester.

WURST IN SHOW

The Curry-wurst Museum in Berlin celebrates a snack which consists of German sausauge slathered in curry-flavoured ketchup. Inventor Herta Heuwer's centenary was celebrated with a Google Doodle last year.

IN THE DRINK

At Hakone Kowakien Yunessun in Kanagawa, Japan, you can bathe in the green tea, coffee, red wine, sake or miso soup (but make sure it's only lukewarm). The wine pool opens only 12 days a year and is hugely popular.

CARHENGE

"Let's take Stonehenge, but make it out of cars, to commemorate my dad." So said Jim Reinders of Nebraska, USA, back in 1987. His dream of a wacky automobile memorial was soon fulfilled using 38 old-fashioned gas-guzzlers.

POTTY TRAINING

Lots of places to sit down at the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets in Delhi, India, which opened in 1994. …

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