Questions of Care


Three awards, administered by the Nieman Foundation, went to work that exposed practices at hospitals in Nevada, Louisiana, Wisconsin and across the country that affected their most vulnerable patients.

2013 WORTH BINGHAM PRIZE FOR INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM The Sacramento Bee "Nevada Patient Busing"

Lead reporters Cynthia Hubert and Phillip Reese, photographer Renee Byer, graphic artist Nathaniel Levine, researcher Pete Basofin, presentation editor Robert Casey, and editor Deborah Anderluh. Over the course of five years, Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital in Las Vegas transported more than 1,500 mentally ill patients out of Nevada--a third of them to California and at least one to each of the lower 48 states-often without treatment plans or housing in place. The series led to a $30 million increase in funding for mental health care in Nevada.

2013 TAYLOR FAMILY AWARD FOR FAIRNESS IN NEWSPAPERS Milwaukee Journal Sentinel "Deadly Delays"

Reporters Mark Johnson, Ellen Gabler, and John Fauber, news applications developer Allan James Vestal, photojournalist Kristyna Wentz-Graff, copy editors Jennifer Steele and Karen Samelson, graphics artist Lou Saldivar, designer Nick Lujero and interactive designer Emily Yount. Thousands of hospitals across the U.S. delayed testing newborn blood samples, causing doctors to miss easily treatable but dangerous conditions in infants. The series led to changes in federal law and the establishment of new safeguards at hospitals.

Finalists: Tampa Bay Times and the Center for Investigative Reporting, "America's Worst Charities"; The Wall Street Journal,"Trials: A Desperate Fight to Save Kids and Change Science"

2014 J. …

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