The Fog of War; READ 1 E Voices of Wounded Military Personnel Are Stark through Owen Sheers' Pink Mist, the Nal Shortlisted Title for Wales Book of the Year AU A THOR' THOR S NOTES

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), July 5, 2014 | Go to article overview

The Fog of War; READ 1 E Voices of Wounded Military Personnel Are Stark through Owen Sheers' Pink Mist, the Nal Shortlisted Title for Wales Book of the Year AU A THOR' THOR S NOTES


PINK Mist began as around thirty interviews I did with psychologically and physically wounded service personnel and their families. e interviews were conducted as part of my research for a play, e Two Worlds of Charlie F., which was created from the experiences of these soldiers, and in which they also made up the majority of the cast.

As such Charlie F. was both a play and a recovery project. Although not a piece of verbatim theatre, because of this aspect of rehabilitation it was important the stories told on stage closely echoed those of the soldiers' in the cast.

e play was a risk, but it worked, both as a recovery project and as theatre, to the extent that just a few weeks ago I was able to go to its 125th performance in Manchester.

Once it was written, however, I found I couldn't let go of its subject matter. I still had lots of material I hadn't used in the stage play, and lots more I wanted to say about the issues of conict aftermath, both for societies and individuals.

It was at this point I was approached by Tim Dee of BBC Bristol. ey were looking to commission a 've part drama, to be broadcast across 've consecutive week nights.

e only prescription in the brief was that it should be somehow related to, or about poetry. Was I, Tim wondered, interested? I knew immediately this was how I wanted to re-visit the territory of my initial interviews, ideally as a verse-drama. It was the form that 'rst drew me.

e prospect of writing a 'play for voices'; a play written for the ear more than the eye. e structure of the 've episodes was also enticing.

It invited a classic 've act dramatic structure, but also presented the opportunity to create coherent, stand-alone story arcs that might be understood on their own, while also maintaining a broader narrative across the whole piece.

But most of all it was the prospect of responding in poetry to the stories the soldiers had told me that I found most exciting.

Voice is a mysterious element in writing, and even more so when writing out of the 'rst person. A negotiation must be made between the voice of the writer, the voice of the piece and the voice of the character.

In Pink Mist, which is about three young friends from Bristol who join the army as squaddies, it was vital their language remained credible at all times: demotic and true. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Fog of War; READ 1 E Voices of Wounded Military Personnel Are Stark through Owen Sheers' Pink Mist, the Nal Shortlisted Title for Wales Book of the Year AU A THOR' THOR S NOTES
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.