"Goodbye God, I'm Going to Texas": The Migration of Louisiana Creoles of Colour and the Preservation of Black Catholic and Creole Traditions in Southeast Texas

By Chambers, Glenn | Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, Spring 2014 | Go to article overview

"Goodbye God, I'm Going to Texas": The Migration of Louisiana Creoles of Colour and the Preservation of Black Catholic and Creole Traditions in Southeast Texas


Chambers, Glenn, Journal of Religion and Popular Culture


The migration of Creoles of Colour (1) from southwestern Louisiana to Houston and the "Golden Triangle" area (Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange, Texas) epitomizes the complexities of race, ethnicity, and culture within the broader African Diaspora. Creoles cultivated a cohesive racial and cultural identity in Texas during the first half of the twentieth century and left an indelible imprint on the larger African American community. This article focuses on the migration of French-speaking blacks and mixed-race Creoles of Colour from Louisiana to Texas during the first half of the twentieth century and the cultural institutions they created in southeast Texas through the auspices of the Catholic Church. Unlike most Catholic populations in the United States during the period, which were largely of recent European immigrant backgrounds, the Creoles of Colour represented a distinct dilemma for the Catholic Church. Creoles were not immigrants, but native-born Americans whose roots in Louisiana often predated the acquisition of Louisiana by the United States. In addition, the fact that the community was of partial African descent and designated as black both legally and by tradition in the United States made them minorities within a larger African American population that was overwhelmingly English-speaking and Protestant. Being francophone and black placed Creoles on the periphery of a Catholic Church with no organized strategy for addressing the needs of black congregants. Most Catholic relief associations and assimilationist strategies were geared toward preserving the faith of European immigrants and their descendants while at the same time Americanizing them and bringing them into the mainstream of the larger white society. As a result, parish priests who encountered Creoles of Colour in Texas were left to their own devices to develop methods of ministering to the Creole population that preserved their Catholic faith, while addressing the impediments of Southern racism and the limitations it placed on African Americans.

Although racial segregation was deeply entrenched in Texas and hindered the economic, political, and social aspirations of many African Americans during this period, many Creoles who came from a similar situation in Louisiana viewed Houston and the "Golden Triangle" as refuges from rural southwestern Louisiana. They saw Texas as a promised land in which economic opportunities were limitless and racism was less inhibiting. Much of this optimism centred on the fact that Creoles were able to escape the worst instances of Jim Crow segregation and discrimination in Texas due to their distinct culture and identity that most Texans were unfamiliar with. While initially the Creole enclaves that existed in African American neighbourhoods developed spontaneously, the growth of economic opportunities and the eventual establishment of black Catholic parishes throughout the region provided spiritual and cultural anchors within Creole communities. The cultural preservation that existed in black Catholic Churches, culminating in the rise of the musical genre known as Zydeco in southeast Texas during the second half of the twentieth century, was the result of the Catholic Church's desire to preserve the faith of these mostly French-speaking, black migrants.

Catholic religious orders such as the Society of St. Joseph of the Sacred Heart (Josephites) insulated its congregants from many aspects of Jim Crow society in its religious environment. While religious customs and traditions flourished in black Catholic parishes throughout the period, and served as a clear cultural marker of Louisiana identity in the African American community, the rise of Zydeco music as the most popular and identifiable expression of Creole culture and the role of these churches in providing the venues for performances of the music represents the culmination of many decades of Church efforts, particularly among the Josephites, to end the cycle that linked the migration of Louisiana black Catholics with abandoning the faith. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

"Goodbye God, I'm Going to Texas": The Migration of Louisiana Creoles of Colour and the Preservation of Black Catholic and Creole Traditions in Southeast Texas
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.