Editor's Note

By Erber, Andrew | Federal Communications Law Journal, April 2014 | Go to article overview

Editor's Note


Erber, Andrew, Federal Communications Law Journal


Welcome to the second Issue of Volume 66 of the Federal Communications Law Journal, the nation's premier communications law journal and the official journal of the Federal Communications Bar Association.

This Issue presents pieces on a variety of important topics in the communications field. The Issue opens with an Article discussing the continued viability of the public switched telephone network ("PSTN") by Kevin Werbach, associate professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the Wharton School in the University of Pennsylvania. Professor Werbach analyzes the public policy principles that have historically justified regulation of the PSTN and develops a conceptual framework for charting a regulatory path as this "network of networks" transitions to an all-IP environment.

Next, the Issue presents an Article from the Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal & Economic Public Policy Studies authored by Chief Economist George S. Ford, President Lawrence J. Spiwak, and Senior Fellows T. Randolph Beard and Michael Stem. The Article discusses the perennial question of efficient spectrum allocation, specifically addressing the mechanisms for managing government spectrum holdings.

In addition to these pieces, this Issue contains three student Notes and one Comment. In the first Note, Meredith Shell examines whether broadband service providers enjoy free speech protections that preclude their regulation under network neutrality principles. …

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