Women in Africa Still Kept on the Margins of Higher Education

Cape Times (South Africa), July 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

Women in Africa Still Kept on the Margins of Higher Education


BYLINE: Rachel Shanyanana

DESPITE numerous strides made by most African countries in creating inclusive educational institutions, male chauvinism, patriarchy and authoritarianism still keep women on the margins of higher education in the continent.

Data constructed from higher education discourses on the plight of women suggest that while they are statistically represented, subtle forms of internal exclusion impede their upliftment and empowerment, deprive them of tools to address societal problems and keep them from fulfilling their aspirations.

They are promised spaces in higher education but not always given the opportunity to share their knowledge through, for example, research outputs at conferences and in publications, as well as contributions to policy changes.

It's fair to say the continuous exclusion of women undermines some of the central ideals of higher education and perpetuates gender inequality and social injustice.

Women must be allowed greater participation in higher education, governance and decision making if we are to create the kind of democratic society that citizens desire.

My study which explores the exclusion of women in African higher education, and the reasons behind it, shows that an ethics of care has the potential to disrupt exclusionary practices within educational institutions and also to afford women their rightful place.

An ethics of care implies that people listen to each other's experiences and act to alleviate exclusion. Second, the caring relation requires a responsibility that allows for the creation of conditions where people can exercise their equality. This can happen when dominant groups recognise the humanity of others by invoking their potential and showing remorse when they are being excluded. Third, the caring relation calls for reasoning abilities that enable people to assert and announce their presence as equal citizens.

The type of caring envisaged focuses on the relationship between the carer and the cared-for. It is a caring that moves beyond sympathy towards empathy, one which recognises mutual respect for and the autonomy of the cared-for. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Women in Africa Still Kept on the Margins of Higher Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.