Idaho's: Implementation of Substance Use Disorder Sercives for Juvenile Jusstce Populations

By Riley, Frank | Corrections Today, May-June 2014 | Go to article overview

Idaho's: Implementation of Substance Use Disorder Sercives for Juvenile Jusstce Populations


Riley, Frank, Corrections Today


Juvenile justice professionals are all too familiar with the fear and frustration of juveniles and their families who are trying to deal with serious behavioral health issues and diminished services in the community. Service systems are changing due to state and national budget cuts and health care reform. In this article, the authors examine the recent implementation of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment services for the juvenile justice population in Idaho in light of such changes, and how they relate to the needs of this population. Idaho's experience restructuring its management of the state's substance abuse treatment for juveniles in the justice system, which includes the Idaho Department of Juvenile Corrections (1DJC) as well as county juvenile justice systems and the courts, with strong local involvement offers important insight for systemic change in the areas of behavioral health and health care reform.

National Perspective and Costs

Behavioral health issues take a toll on individuals, families and communities. Like physical illnesses, they cost money and lives if they are not prevented, if they are left untreated or if they are poorly managed. According to information provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) (1)

* By 2020, mental illnesses and SUDs will surpass all physical diseases as a major cause of disability worldwide;

* Physical, emotional and sexual abuse, as well as family dysfunction, are often associated with mental illness, substance abuse and physical illnesses in adulthood;

* Childhood trauma is extensive: More than 6 out of 10 youths in the U.S. have been exposed to violence within the past 12 months, and 1 in 10 was injured; and

* The economic cost of behavioral disorders among youths is estimated to be $247 billion annually.

Idaho Juvenile Justice Clients and Behavioral Health Needs

In Idaho, juveniles who enter the justice system have specialized mental health and/or substance abuse needs. The data from Idaho's juvenile justice system is consistent with national trends. From 2005 to 2010, the percentage of juveniles committed to state custody who were identified with mental health, substance abuse or co-occurring treatment needs increased to more than 30 percent. Among juveniles ages 14 and younger who were committed to state custody, 50 percent have histories of children's mental health involvement; almost 70 percent have histories of abuse; and more than 60 percent have been previously placed outside of their own homes. For committed juveniles ages 15 and older, 40 percent have children's mental health and/or protective services histories.

Clinicians working in Idaho's county detention centers have been providing behavioral health screening services for more than four years. The most recent project evaluation completed by Boise State University reveals that more than 58 percent of juveniles screened met the Alaska Screening Tool criteria for having a mental health problem. For young women screened, the percentage was almost 67 percent. More than 42 percent of juveniles screened met criteria for an SUD. The fact that juveniles in Idaho's justice system demonstrate these high levels of need--beyond their delinquency--has implications for the safety of Idaho communities, for families and staff, as well as for other juveniles. Maintaining the ability to serve these juveniles as much as possible in the community is critical to successful treatment; important in managing population numbers and costs; and necessary to minimize the liability associated with threats to the safety of staff and juveniles.

Multiple Needs, Multiple Systems Nationally, juvenile clients often present a profile of multiple needs and they often have been served by multiple systems, sometimes with competing short-term interests. Table 1 provides data documenting the multiple needs and systems characteristic of juveniles receiving substance abuse treatment nationally. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Idaho's: Implementation of Substance Use Disorder Sercives for Juvenile Jusstce Populations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.