Camel Caravan Aids Isolated Tribesmen in Drought-Affected Sudan

UN Chronicle, May 1985 | Go to article overview

Camel Caravan Aids Isolated Tribesmen in Drought-Affected Sudan


Camel caravan aids isolated tribesmen in drought-affected Sudan

"This food has given us another chance", a nomad of the Sudanhs Haddendawa tribe said. "But when it runs out, I don't know what we shall do."

He lives in the rugged and inaccessible Ekidi Hills region, about 200 kilometres south-west of Port Sudan, and was talking to a member of UNICEF's unusual "camel caraven", which went to the area in late March 1985 to assess the condition of the isolated tribesmen and supply them with urgent assistance.

UNICEF staff used 20 camels in its three-day mission. The team afterwards concluded that camel transport was a viable way of supplying aid to isolated communities, and more expeditions are planned.

At one stop, caravan members distributed relief goods to five families camping out near the wells of the Bel Utr settlement.

Each family received one sack of wheat, a tin of edible fat and some dried milk--enough food, according to UNICEF estimates, for a family of five for a month. Each also received two blankets.

Thirteen families were supposed to be living in the area. "Can't you give us food for the people who aren't here?" asked one nomad. Expedition members explained reluctantly that the policy was to distribute goods only to families present.

One tribesman apologetically told expedition members on their arrival at the settlement "We have no milk to offer you. The goats give us hardly any now. This used to be a rich area for grazing. Many of our animals have died in the past three years. If things don't improve we shall have to move soon."

The Haddendawa tribesmen have always led lives of extreme hardship, UNICEF representatives reported. Guiding their flocks of sheep, goats, and camel herds over the high passes of mountains, family groups may be separated from the rest of the tribe for most of the year. Lack of rain over the last five years, however, has brought the tribe to the very edge of extinction.

Hillsides once rich with grass and trees have turned into sterile wasteland and are littered with the carcasses of dead livestock. Thousands of nomads have fled to the shanty-towns of urban centres such as Port Sudan. Others have remained behind to sit out what has become the worst drought in memory, settling around remote wells in the highlands, spending their days searching for grazing areas for their remaining animals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Camel Caravan Aids Isolated Tribesmen in Drought-Affected Sudan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.