ICAIL 2013: The Fourteenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law

By Verheij, Bart; Francesconi, Enrico et al. | AI Magazine, Summer 2014 | Go to article overview

ICAIL 2013: The Fourteenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law


Verheij, Bart, Francesconi, Enrico, Gardner, Anne, AI Magazine


The 14th International Conference on AI and Law (ICAIL 2013) was held in Rome, Italy, June 10-14, 2013.

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It is not a coincidence that the research fields of artificial intelligence and of law have met and have merged into the interdisciplinary research field of artificial intelligence and law. Both fields use formal methods, with their strengths and limitations; in AI there are software, logic, and statistics, in law there are statutes, procedures, and institutions. Both fields are creative; in AI, systems are built, experiments designed, and paradigms replaced; in law, regulations are passed by lawmakers, precedents are set, and ideologies balanced. Both fields struggle with the inevitable complexity of modeling human behavior--in AI with the goal to reconstruct human behavior, in law with the goal to steer human behavior. These and other similarities are driving the active and dedicated community of AI and law. Researchers are taking their inspiration from the law with its insights developed over millennia combining them with AI's half a century of lessons.

The beginnings of AI and law are marked by the first International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL) held in Boston in 1987, a quarter of a century ago. Ever since that first conference, the biennial ICAIL conference series has been a primary forum for the exchange and discussion of the latest research insights in the interdisciplinary field of artificial intelligence and law. The Fourteenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (Rome, Italy, June 10-14, 2013) continued from these 25-year-old achievements, and provided a program consisting of invited lectures, full papers, research abstracts, system demonstrations, workshops, and tutorials.

The invited speakers of the conference were Rosaria Conte (ISTC-CNR, Institute for Cognitive Science and Technology of the CNR), who discussed the emergence and change of norms of different types using agent simulations as an experimental tool; Paul Thagard (University of Waterloo), who presented a neural process theory of intentions, connecting to free will and legal responsibility; and Radboud Winkels (University of Amsterdam), who spoke about 25 years of AI and law and the difficulties of turning data into knowledge. Peter van Koppen (Maastricht University, Free University Amsterdam) discussed the handling of evidence in law, and what can (and cannot) be expected from modeling tools.

There were 17 full paper presentations (selected from 53 submissions by the international program committee), and i3 research abstract presentations. In order to emphasize the importance of implemented systems for the field, we also called for system demonstrations; 7 were accepted for the conference, 1 of them associated with a research abstract and 6 of them described in a demonstration extended abstract. …

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