Social Networking Offers Increased Agility: Research Suggests the Need for a Smarter Combination of Enterprise Social Networking Tools

By Klie, Leonard | CRM Magazine, June 2014 | Go to article overview

Social Networking Offers Increased Agility: Research Suggests the Need for a Smarter Combination of Enterprise Social Networking Tools


Klie, Leonard, CRM Magazine


Recent research by Frost & Sullivan supports the business need for enterprise social networking and collaboration tools to increase employee engagement, accelerate decision-making, and boost overall productivity, but there remain a few obstacles to overcome.

"Enterprise social networking continues to have mass appeal as it combines the user friendliness and relationship-oriented nature of consumer social media with more powerful features and enterprise-grade control," according to Robert Arnold, industry principal at Frost & Sullivan.

Unlike social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, which are public, enterprise social networks are closed communities. But when used properly, these communities enable employees to find company information and resources and contribute their expertise across the entire organization, says Arnold, who authored the report "Analysis of the Global Enterprise Social Networking Market."

The research in his report put the total number of full-suite enterprise social platform subscribers at 208 million in 2013. That so many people are already using the technology surprised Arnold. "It's much more widely adopted than we expected," he tells CRM. "It's not as nascent a market as we thought."

Still, there is a lot more room for enterprise social networking to grow. Arnold predicts that the number of enterprise social network users will reach 535 million in 2018. But even that is a small representation of the technology's total potential. About 2 billion workers worldwide across numerous industries, organizations, locations, and job roles could benefit from enterprise social networking tools, Arnold asserts.

Of those currently using enterprise social networking, Arnold says most are midlevel employees in jobs that comprise accounting, clerical, administration, sales, marketing, customer service, human resources, and the like.

Though some C-level executives have taken to social networking, they make up a small base of users. Enterprise social networking "needs to become more useful up and down the corporate ladder," Arnold says. "It can definitely be applied to other groups within the organization," such as basic knowledge and office workers as well as shop floor and shipping and receiving departments, he says. …

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