Lollapalooza Marks a Decade in Chicago

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 31, 2014 | Go to article overview

Lollapalooza Marks a Decade in Chicago


Byline: Associated Press

Once the vagabond of the music festival and touring circuit, Lollapalooza marks its 10th anniversary in Chicago when it opens for three days starting Friday with a lineup including Eminem, Outkast and Kings of Leon.

"We are very into the idea of being an international music event," Lollapalooza founder Perry Farrell said in a recent interview. "But I would have to acknowledge that if it were not for Chicago, that beautiful showroom, I don't think we would be in the position we're in now."

Farrell, the leader singer of Jane's Addiction, started Lollapalooza in 1991. It was a tour until 1997 before a hiatus until 2003. There were struggles in 2004 when the event was canceled just weeks before it was to get underway because of poor ticket sales. But in 2005, Lollapalooza came to Chicago's lakefront Grant Park where it hosted several dozen musical artists on five stages over two days. The headline in the Chicago Tribune the day after the festival ended read: "Successapalooza."

Its second year in Chicago, Lollapalooza grew to about 130 acts on nine stages with capacity for 75,000 people. This year promoters expect 100,000 on each day with as many acts on eight stages. The festival has grown over its years in Chicago, adding food tents with offerings from gourmet chefs and a children's section. And it has brought acts like Lady Gaga, Nine Inch Nails, the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Coldplay to town.

Eventually, Lollapalooza became the basis for the modern festival culture and circuit that has evolved since, including events like Bonnaroo, Coachella and a legion of smaller multiday parties. …

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