Growth Seen in Industrial/organizational Psychology

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 4, 2014 | Go to article overview

Growth Seen in Industrial/organizational Psychology


Adrinne Jackson quickly found herself in a new role managing Internet protocol customer satisfaction review consultants in the corporate finance division of AT&T only a few months after graduating from Argosy University, Schaumburg with her Master of Arts degree in Industrial/Organizational Psychology in 2013.

"The applied Industrial/Organizational Psychology program afforded me the opportunity to make myself a better leader by giving me the knowledge to help my employees become promotable and prepare them to embrace change," said Adrinne.

Argosy University's Industrial/Organizational Psychology program centers on the scientific study of the critical business issues in today's workplace, such as talent management, coaching, assessment, engagement, selection, training, organizational development, performance and work-life balance. As many companies face change in order to remain competitive in today's turbulent marketplace, becoming an industrial/organizational (I/O) professional allows business leaders, " a the opportunity to be a 'creator of change' during internal corporate mergers," said Adrinne. People attracted to the field of I/O psychology desire to help both businesses and employees achieve their full potential. Industrial/Organizational Psychology students are interested in understanding how people behave at work and enjoy problem solving by analyzing data.

Unfortunately, many people are unaware that an I/O psychology career path exists despite the demand for these professionals at companies across the United States. This demand is supported by the 1,300 projected job openings between 2012 and 2022 reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Several Chicagoland companies have hired or promoted Argosy University's industrial/organizational psychology graduates including Allstate, Aerotek, AthletiCo, AT&T, SGS Life Science Services, T-Mobile, and U.S. Cellular. Typical career titles of an I/O psychologist may include analyst, consultant, researcher, coach, trainer or counselor.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the projected growth rate of I/O psychologists between 2012 and 2022 is at 53 percent, faster than other career fields. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Growth Seen in Industrial/organizational Psychology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.