Sharing Sacred Spaces in the Mediterranean: Christians, Muslims, and Jews at Shrines and Sanctuaries

By Morrow, John Andrew | Journal of Ecumenical Studies, Spring 2014 | Go to article overview

Sharing Sacred Spaces in the Mediterranean: Christians, Muslims, and Jews at Shrines and Sanctuaries


Morrow, John Andrew, Journal of Ecumenical Studies


Sharing Sacred Spaces in the Mediterranean: Christians, Muslims, and Jews at Shrines and Sanctuaries. Edited by Dionigi Albera and Maria Couroucli. New Anthropologies of Europe. Bloomington and Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Press, 2012. Pp. 277. $70.00, cloth; $24.99, paper.

Gender, Nation, and Religion in European Pilgrimage. Edited by Willy Jansen and Catrien Notermans. Burlington, VT, and Famham, Surrey, U.K.: Ashgate Publishing, 2012. Pp. 232. $99.95.

Comparing and contrasting these two books is no easy task. Sharing Sacred Spaces contains a variety of clearly connected studies. Gender, Nation, and Religion is a compilation of disparate studies without a strong cohesive thread. As a reviewer, my assessment is informed by my interests, which, in this case, revolve around ecumenical studies. Since I am concerned primarily with promoting a better understanding of the three Abrahamic faiths, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and improving relations between and among them, I seek information directly related to these goals. Readers motivated by other objectives will certainly find other interesting aspects in both books. How, then, do they contribute to interfaith dialogue?

As a Muslim scholar who is intimately familiar with Islam, Christianity, and Judaism, I found little of interest in Gender, Nation, and Religion in European Pilgrimage. Of the thirteen standard-fare scholarly studies dealing with pilgrimages of all kinds, the only two that aroused my interest were "Festivals of Moors and Christians" by Henk Driessen and "The Virgin Mary, the Sanctuary, and the Mosque" by Dionigi Albera. This is not to say that the other studies are of no value. They certainly make a contribution to scholarship. They do not however, contribute much toward ecumenical understanding.

As interesting as the festival of Moors and Christians, which replays the religious frontier in Andalusia, Spain, may be, the treatment of this topic leaves much to be desired. This article, published in 2012, is based in large part on the author's stay in Spain in the 1970's and in Melilla in the 1980's. As therapeutic as reminiscing about one's past may be for some, armchair scholarship is not what is expected from an academic. Throw in details of your past travels if you wish, but, please, make an attempt to conduct some field work that has some currency. As for the article's important points, I can summarize them as follows: Spaniards continue to celebrate the re-conquest, defeat, and expulsion of Muslims from the Iberian Peninsula (p. 186); the message of the festival is clear that "Christians embody good, spiritual health, humanity, faith and civilization; in contrast, Moors represent evil, spiritual malady, sub-humanity, heresy and barbarism" (p. 189). It comes as no surprise, then, that Muslims continue to be viewed with contempt by many Spaniards. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sharing Sacred Spaces in the Mediterranean: Christians, Muslims, and Jews at Shrines and Sanctuaries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.