Reindeer Dogs from Alaska's Cranky Hot Dog Vendor

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 17, 2014 | Go to article overview

Reindeer Dogs from Alaska's Cranky Hot Dog Vendor


Byline: Rachel D'Oro Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- There's no shortage of hot dog stands hawking that spicy, oh-so-Alaska treat, the reindeer dog, in downtown Anchorage. But only one of them has consistently long lines.

M.A.'s Gourmet Dogs is owned by a guy with an attitude and seven types of tasty grilled dogs -- including one with a little bit of Rudolph in it. The reindeer meat, too lean to hold together alone, is mixed with pork and beef. It's the hands-down crowd favorite, every bite delivering a pleasing crunchy pop.

This is Michael Anderson's hot dog stand, a mobile feast beneath a big green umbrella near the corner of Fourth Avenue and F Street, parked outside the Federal Building. He's been selling dogs downtown for 22 years during Alaska's summer tourist season, even on the rainiest days, and he's such a draw that an adjacent competitor started using a green umbrella too.

Just remember: Anderson has been called the "hot dog Nazi" more than once, a reference to the "soup Nazi" on the old "Seinfeld" TV series. The soup Nazi was a cranky soup vendor with lots of arbitrary rules, and Anderson has his own rules of engagement posted on a sign: End all cellphone talk at the counter, end all conversations with other diners when it's your turn, wait to order until "the wienie behind the stand asks for it," and finally, step to the right "and pay for this abuse." Signed: "XX00. M.A."

In other words, there's no time for indecision when you deal with this no-nonsense proprietor. …

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