It's All Going at a Rate of Knots; A Sketch of a Lifeboat Led Artist Charles Evans on to Greater Things, as DAVID WHETSTONE Finds Out

The Journal (Newcastle, England), August 19, 2014 | Go to article overview

It's All Going at a Rate of Knots; A Sketch of a Lifeboat Led Artist Charles Evans on to Greater Things, as DAVID WHETSTONE Finds Out


IF you work in an office or miles from the coast it is easy to forget that we are an island nation and plenty of our fellow citizens regularly find themselves in peril on the sea.

Charles Evans, who lives not far from the sea in Northumberland, got a reminder of this with a watercolour painting of a lifeboat.

It appeared in the August edition of Culture magazine, published free every month with The Journal, and became a bit of a sensation on social media.

One painting led to another and another... and may yet lead to another as Charles responds to the widespread interest in his depictions of lifeboats and his mounting admiration for their crews of volunteers.

Beginning at the beginning, he recalls: "I was leading a painting group in Amble and the Humber and the Hartlepool lifeboats were both up on the chocks in the boatyard getting repaired.

"It was quite an amazing sight. The first painting I did of the Hartlepool lifeboat was in the last Culture magazine and I found everyone was talking about it.

"On Twitter the picture got more than 500 retweets but people were also sending messages or coming up to talk about it."

The response got Charles thinking that he would do something for the RNLI (Royal National Lifeboat Institution).

"The thing is, we live in the North East and we've got sea all along one side of us.

"Many of us see it all the time and it's easy to take it for granted. But these guys (the lifeboat crews) are out there all the time saving people's lives... and they're all volunteers."

Charles, who spends much of his time hosting painting masterclasses around the country, says the first painting sparked plenty of comment among his masterclass pupils.

"It's amazing how many people have come up to me and said they were rescued or picked up or towed in by the RNLI. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

It's All Going at a Rate of Knots; A Sketch of a Lifeboat Led Artist Charles Evans on to Greater Things, as DAVID WHETSTONE Finds Out
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.