Trouble in A&E, the Triumph of All-Women Shortlists and the Joy of Summer Caravanning

By Smith, Jacqui | New Statesman (1996), July 25, 2014 | Go to article overview

Trouble in A&E, the Triumph of All-Women Shortlists and the Joy of Summer Caravanning


Smith, Jacqui, New Statesman (1996)


You may remember the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham as the splendid venue for the launch of Labour's 2010 election campaign. It was also the place where Tony Blair was challenged by Sharron Storer over her partner's cancer treatment in 2001--but don't let either of those events colour your judgement. I'm very proud to chair the NHS trust that runs it. However, like the rest of the health service, we're facing unprecedented pressures.

A decade ago, the old emergency department at Selly Oak was seeing 60,000 people each year. The A&E at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital was built to accommodate 81,000. Last year, we saw 95,000 and the figure is rising. Our chief executive, Dame Julie Moore, describes A&E as the "canary in the mine" for the health service. This canary will soon need to be nailed to its perch.

We have found that when it's harder to see a GP, people visit casualty, where the lights never go off; as social care is cut and social care workers are forced to make shorter visits, more people turn up at the door of a hospital. Mental health faces the biggest cuts in the NHS and we find that those in crisis come to our A&E or go into a police cell. When many are struggling to make ends meet, it's not surprising that there are more people with malnutrition, scurvy and rickets needing our care.

Recent Commonwealth Fund research identified the NHS as the best system among 11 major developed countries for quality of care, access and efficiency. The NHS model isn't broken but it needs urgent attention and support.

Spending a lot of time on trains, I enjoy the eccentric pastimes of my fellow travellers, One woman got on to the early-morning train to London, pulled out a hairdryer, plugged it in and dried her hair. Last week, I sat next to someone rolling a cigarette and reflected on the transformation made by the smoking ban. Feel free to roll but thank goodness you can't smoke it next to me.

The same Commonwealth Fund research that found the NHS to be the most effective health service also reported that we are one of the least healthy societies (the UK came tenth out of the u countries). We should learn from the success of the smoking ban. Governments of all persuasions have expected NHS providers to take tough decisions but avoided them themselves. At the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, we transplant livers for alcoholics but the government avoids minimum pricing for alcohol. More than one in ten of our patients have diabetes but action on healthier food is left to the willingness of food manufacturers and retailers to put different colours on their labels. …

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