Making the Cut

Manila Bulletin, August 22, 2014 | Go to article overview

Making the Cut


Of the many things that socio-economic enterprises are expected to do, where they have to make the cut, for the sake of their continuing survival and long-term sustainability, is in the economic viability field. These enterprises have to show proof that they can meet their payroll and pay their other bills---and still have something reasonable, left as a fair reward for entrepreneurial risk-taking. If they are failing in this area, advocates should train all of their focus and attention to ensuring that the enterprises they work with eventually succeed, sooner rather than later. However, it is not only in the economic viability area where socio-economic enterprises have to make the cut. They also need assistance in some instances, special and focused assistance---in three other areas, and these are: The regulatory and legal area. Enterprises need to operate within the rule of law, and for that matter of rules and regulations that specifically apply to them. They should look at the law and the many rules and regulations that the law spawns as their protection: against abuse, and against anyone going out of line such that the interests of many other parties, let alone of the general public, would be violated or compromised. Deep respect for all just laws, rules and regulations is a guideline, which provides continuing direction to all the decisions and actions of socio-economic enterprises. The social and cultural area. Going by the principle that laws set the minimum standard for behaviour, socio-economic enterprises seek guidelines for their decisions and actions also from the social and cultural norms prevailing in the community. These norms come from the voice of the people; it speaks out, often very clearly and articulately, on what is right or wrong for the community welfare and for the advancement of the economy. In this regard, social media and industry associations can provide soft guidelines, which nonetheless are very useful to take into serious consideration. …

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