UNIDO Becomes the United Nations 16th Specialized Agency on 21 June

UN Chronicle, June 1985 | Go to article overview

UNIDO Becomes the United Nations 16th Specialized Agency on 21 June


UNIDO becomes the United Nations 16th specialized agency on 21 June

On 21 June the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) became the sixteenth specialized agency of the United Nations.

Article 25 of UNIDO's new Constitution required that at least 80 countries which had already deposited instruments of ratification, acceptance or approval, notify the Secretary-General of their agreement that the Organization's new Constitution should come int force.

Notifications from Ethiopia, the Ivory Coast and Jamaica were received on 21 June, bringing the total number of notifications to 82.

The entry int force of the Constitution was the culmination of 10 years of planning and negotiating to convert UNIDO from a component part of the United Nations system into an independent specialized agency responsible for promoting industrialization in developing countries. This was the first time that such an event had occurred in the UN system, all other specialized agencies having been independent bodies from their inception.

Major progress in the conversion process was achieved on 10 June in New York at the closing meeting of consultations on the conversion of UNIDO into a specialized agency. The meeting recommended that States inform the Secretary-General before 30 June of their agreement that the Constitution enter into force. At the outset of the meeting, only eight States had done so. By the end of the one-day meeting, 63 notifications had been received.

Secretary-General Javier Perez de Cuellar told the meeting that UNIDO had been created as, and still was, a subsidiary organ of the United Nations. The new organization would bear the same name and assume most of the programmes and assets of the existing organization.

The new organization, he said, would join a select group of United Nations specialized agencies. It would be an organization that would perform a most valuable service for the world community, both in assisting developing countries in advancing their industrial development and in helping those already industrialized in co-ordinating their activities for the mutual benefit of countries.

The international community, he continued, might confidently expect that the new organization, after its unique two decades of nurture and development within the central organization, would be able to utilize its new independence by tackling the tremendous tasks facing it with renewed vigour and enhanced strength and confidence.

The first session of the General Conference of UNIDO as a specialized agency, to be held in Vienna in August, was to elect a Director-General, and the membership of UNIDO's policy-making body, the Industrial Development Board (IDB) and its Programme and Budget Committee. A second session to be held later in 1985 was expected to adopt UNIDO's programme budget for the coming biennium (1986-87).

Regular budget expenditures are to be borne by the new agency's membership, as apportioned in accordance with a scale of assessment based, to the extent possible, on that of the United Nations.

Background

In 1966, the General Assembly established UNIDO as an integral part of the United Nations system. …

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