Current Bibliography

By Butler, Janine | Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, Spring 2013 | Go to article overview

Current Bibliography


Butler, Janine, Nathaniel Hawthorne Review


Bibliographies

Arcurio, Dayna. "Current Bibliography." Nathaniel Hawthorne Review 38.1 (2012): 111-122.

Smith, Andrew M., and Elizabeth Wright. "Hawthorne." American Literary Scholarship, 2010. Ed. David J. Nordloh. Durham, N.C.: Duke UP, 2012. 37-51.

Editions

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Marble Faun. Intro. Andrew Delbanco. Cambridge: Belknap of Harvard UP, 2013.

This new John Harvard Library edition reproduces the authoritative text of The Marble Faun from The Centenary Edition of the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Delbanco's fourteen-page introduction traces the biographical origins of the tale and Hawthorne's desire to liberate and renew his creative powers. Delbanco then analyzes Hawthorne's treatment of the following themes in The Marble Faun\ freedom, Rome as "an externalization of the interior mental world" in which the past and the future are always present (xiv), awakening consciousness, transformations, religion, and art. This edition also features a note on the text, a chronology of Hawthorne's life, and a selected bibliography.

--. Nathaniel Hawthorne's Tales. Ed. James McIntosh. New York: Norton, 2012.

This revised Norton Critical Edition includes twenty-three of Hawthorne's tales with accompanying explanatory annotations, including two tales new to this edition, "The Wives of the Dead," and "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment." Also new to this edition is the early biographical sketch "Mrs. Hutchinson." Extensive secondary material includes "The Author on His Work," which contains letters written by Hawthorne and excerpts from The American Notebooks. The criticism section is divided into two parts. "Early Criticism" includes the reactions of Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, and others to Hawthorne's tales. In "Modern Criticism," writers from Jorge Luis Borges to Nina Baym address topics such as poetry, Puritanism, the moral world, science, and epiphanies in Hawthorne's tales. Four essays are new to this edition, which also contains a chronology and a selected bibliography.

Books

Greven, David. The Fragility of Manhood: Hawthorne, Freud, and the Politics of Gender. Columbus: Ohio State UP, 2012.

Greven synthesizes psychoanalytic, visual, and queer theories to evaluate Hawthornes representation of masculinity and narcissism in his male characters. Arguing that "the young man's conflict over his own image is one of the most consistently developed themes in Hawthorne's oeuvre" (1), Greven states that Hawthorne's young men symbolize the figure of Narcissus because they are in conflict with their own image, physically beautiful, and morally dubious. He focuses on Hawthorne's skepticism towards his attractive men and argues that Hawthorne "sees gender as unintelligible without the visual" (6). Going further, Hawthorne sees the law as repressing desire with dire consequences and is acutely aware of the conflict between what a man desires and what the law dictates. Greven explores the implications of visuality's centrality for men and social relations in "Rappaccini's Daughter," "The Gentle Boy," The Blithedale Romance, Septimius Felton, and other writings.

Kevorkian, Martin. Writing Beyond Prophecy: Emerson, Hawthorne, and Melville After the American Renaissance. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2013.

Kevorkian draws focus to the later careers and works of Emerson, Hawthorne, and Melville, including Hawthorne's posthumously published Elixir of Life. Kevorkian notes that their later works, all of which feature conflicted divinity students, "enact and represent a set of shared concerns about ministry and vocation" and "reflect upon earlier moments in these authors' careers" (3). Arguing that these authors--as young writers--set themselves apart from the role of the minister, Kevorkian asserts that their writings can be examined as "Writing after the Minister." A chapter titled "Hawthorne's Sermon" traces young Hawthorne's early preaching and theological studies, his "positioning of his discourse as outside the church" (95) in texts such as The Scarlet Letter, and ultimately his questioning of ministry and vocation in Elixir of Life. …

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