Dinner with Lenny: The Last Long Interview with Leonard Bernstein

By Helgert, Lars | Notes, September 2014 | Go to article overview

Dinner with Lenny: The Last Long Interview with Leonard Bernstein


Helgert, Lars, Notes


Dinner with Lenny: The Last Long Interview with Leonard Bernstein. By Jonathan Cott. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. [183 p. ISBN 9780199858446. $24.95.] Illustrations, bibliography, index.

Over the course of a career that spanned nearly five decades, Leonard Bernstein was the subject of hundreds, if not thousands, of interviews. Many of these interviews are readily available in (now digitized) print media such as newspapers, general interest periodicals, and music magazines. Additionally, The Leonard Bernstein Collection at the Library of Congress holds transcripts of several film and television interviews, and the collection is open to researchers and the general public (http://memory.loc.gov/ ammem/collections/bernstein/, accessed 21 March 2014). If interviews of Bernstein are so voluminous and easy to obtain, readers may ask what justifies the publication of the book-length Dinner with Lenny, especially since it is based on previously-released material. The most obvious answer to this question is the fact that it was Bernstein's last extended interview. It is appealing to contemplate the image of the venerable musician dispensing sage wisdom in the twilight of his life. That this interview was intended for a different readership than most Bernstein question-and-answer sessions also leaps immediately to mind, as does the interview's value as a primary historical source. Finally, Bernstein's schedule and publications' space limitations often precluded lengthier conversations of the type included in this book.

In November 1989, Rolling Stone journalist Jonathan Cott was granted an interview with Leonard Bernstein after vetting by Bernstein's assistants. This interview, which took place at Bernstein's home in Fairfield, Connecticut, was originally published in Rolling Stone no. 592 (29 November 1990), with excerpts also appearing in Rolling Slone no. 641 (15 October 1992). Both are available via trial subscription from the Rolling Stone Web site and in libraries. Dinner with Lenny is basically an extended version of the published Rolling Stone interview, with the addition of a "Prelude" and a "Postlude." The "Prelude" features a biographical synopsis of Bernstein's life and describes how Cott was able to get the interview, while the "Postlude" recounts Cott's post-interview contact with Bernstein and summarizes the last year of the maestro's life. The interview itself takes up 122 of the book's 183 pages, and includes a good deal of material left out of the 1990 piece. As Cott notes, Rolling Stone allotted 8,000 words for the original publication, but their twelve-hour conversation encompassed more than four times that (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Dinner with Lenny: The Last Long Interview with Leonard Bernstein
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.