Swedish Bankers Take a Different Approach to Learning

By Berry, Leonard L. | American Banker, June 12, 1985 | Go to article overview

Swedish Bankers Take a Different Approach to Learning


Berry, Leonard L., American Banker


GUNNAR STEENMARK is a change agent. Mr. Steenmark is a vice president with the Swedish Savings Bank Association in Stockholm. Along with his many other duties, he organizes marketing seminars for Swedish savings bankers. Bob Huss, senior vice president of marketing at Secuirty Pacific National Bank; George Rieder, president of George Rieder Associates, and I participated in his most recent seminar -- a May meeting in Stockholm.

Mr. Huss, Mr. Rieder, and I were the only presenters at the two-day seminar. Mr. Steenmark is willing to bring in presenters from anywhere in the world if he believes they have fresh ideas to impart. The fact that this particular seminar was led by three Americans didn't trouble him. His objective: "to open minds, to plant seeds."

He also brings his own bankers to other countries. This fall he will bring a group to the United States to study bank marketing practices, the second such trip in two years.

Mr. Steenmark's concept of education as the pathway to constructive, industrywide change in Sweden and the educational methods he employs are worthy of our attention. Gunnar Steenmark has something to teach all of us.

the seminar, attended by about 35 marketing and line operating executives, focused on the theme of developing a sales culture in a bank.

Day 1 began with all participants introducing themselves and stating what they hoped to learn. Each person's learning objectives were transcribed on large sheets of paper that were taped to the walls.

The three speakers then briefly introduced their topics and explained how these topics would relate to each other. I made the first presentation on a conceptual framework for developing strong sales cultures. George Rieder then discussed strategies for managing organizational change and talked about qualities of effective leaders.

Next, the group discussed what they had learned from the two presentations and how they could apply these ideas in their banks. Included in this discussion was a case problem on bank sales programs which they had received prior to the seminar. Networking, learning, and laughter characterized the reception and group dinner that followed. Mr. Huss, Mr. Rieder, and I were spirited participants.

Day 2 began with Bob Huss' "case history" on Security Pacific's approach to building a sales culture. Mr. Huss highlighted key implementation issues for concepts presented on the first day.

The participants then divided into four smaller groups for 30-minute private meetings with each of us and with Rolf Andersson, head of the Savings Bank University. The groups ahd carefully planned the questions they raised, leading to stimulating, provocative, useful exchanges. Finally, the smaller groups merged into one for a wrap-up-/feedback session, and it was over.

Gunnar Steenmark's educational philosophy and methods offer us lessons to ponder the next time we chair a conference or plan a meeting.

1. Foster dialogue. Mr. Steenmark doesn't leave audience/speaker dialogue to chance. He programs it. He continually searches for ways to spark an interactive experience. He reasons that true dialogue is more valuable, more lasting, and more fun than when one paryt does all of the talking and the other all of the listening.

Mr. Sttenmark's model encompasses having only a few speakers, keeping then around for the entire seminar, and providing multiple opportunities for them to interact with the participants.

when you are a speaker for Mr. Steenmark, you eat with the bankers, not with the other speakers. Indeed, you are more than a speaker; you are a resource!

2. Encourage networking. Mr. Steenmark recognizes that one of the most important potential benefits of a seminar is to extend one's network of contacts. A close look at Mr. Steenmark's seminar design (participatn introductions, case problem, leisurely group dinner) reveals formal efforts to encourage networking. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Swedish Bankers Take a Different Approach to Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.