NATO BY NUMBERS; Comment&Analysis Politics, Comment and Analysis Edited by Alison Sanders

Wales On Sunday (Cardiff, Wales), September 7, 2014 | Go to article overview

NATO BY NUMBERS; Comment&Analysis Politics, Comment and Analysis Edited by Alison Sanders


T saw the eyes of the world focused on South Wales for the largest get together of world leaders ever to take place in Britain.

IHelicopters were a common sight in the skies over the region, while an impressive fleet of warships parked up in Cardiff docks for the two-day Nato summit.

As ever, it was accompanied by the usual demonstrations from those who regard it as little more than a vehicle for US military aggression and a huge security presence, including a ring of steel around Cardiff Castle and the Celtic Manor.

Here we capture the scale of the summit in some astounding figures: 1,500 media staff from all over the world gathered to cover every moment of the Summit.

28 member states make up Nato, a military alliance unified by a vow that an attack on one is an attack on all.

1,000 plus schoolchildren in Wales were taught from the Nato lesson plan.

The number of times an armoured personnel vehicle has been parked on the Celtic Manor golf course.

vehicle has been parked on the Celtic Manor golf course.

1 Red Arrows led a stunning display of military power in the skies across Cardiff Bay as part of the Nato Summit on Friday morning.

9,500 9,500 police officers from 43 forces formed another protective layer between the world leaders and the protesters waving Palestinian flags to highlight the death of more than 2,100 people in Gaza since start of Israeli air strikes on July 8.

2 civil servants were arrested as "war criminals" by anti-Nato protesters after being let through a protective steel cordon to present messages of peace to world leaders on Thursday. …

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