Fatty Patty Hemingway, King of the Hamburgers

By Cloake, Felicity | New Statesman (1996), August 22, 2014 | Go to article overview

Fatty Patty Hemingway, King of the Hamburgers


Cloake, Felicity, New Statesman (1996)


Ernest Hemingway was a man firmly of the belief that "living well is the best revenge"--just check out the evocative descriptions of oysters and crisp white wine in his memoir A Moveable Feast for proof. But a recent release of papers from his Cuban estate shows that he never entirely lost the tastes of his Illinois childhood: in fact, some of the leanest prose in 20th-century American literature was fuelled by some unashamedly fatty patties.

His fourth wife, Mary, divulged the juicy details to the Woman's Day Encyclopaedia of Cookery, explaining that she cooked up these particular burgers "to fortify us for tramping through sagebrush after pheasant, partridge, or ducks, or, after such hikes, to console us for not having shot our limits". (You didn't picture Ernest wearing an apron, did you?)

Papa's appetites in no way matched the spareness of his prose. The recipe adds "all sorts of goodies" to the standard minced-beef base with "a gusto that's very characteristic" of the great man, according to Sandra Spanier, general editor of the Hemingway Letters Project.

The original, available online for anyone who wants to pay homage to this giant of good living, calls for garlic, spring onion, India relish (piccalilli), capers and wine, plus two American spice blends by the name of Beau Monde seasoning and Mei Yen powder, which turn out to consist largely of salt, sugar and monosodium glutamate, with celery and onion powder thrown in for good measure. Not, with the exception of the salt, things I'd usually include, but hey, Hemingway knows best--and by the time I have mentally factored in the parsley, grated apple, Cheddar and carrots, shredded ham, soy sauce and tomato hastily scribbled in the margins of the typescript, it's looking more like an all-you-can-eat buffet than a burger anyway.

The instructions that follow offer a taste of Mary's own skill as a writer--she met Hemingway in wartime Paris through her work as a correspondent for Time magazine, and even here it shows. …

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