Russian Life Books: Fiction & Language Learning

Russian Life, September-October 2014 | Go to article overview

Russian Life Books: Fiction & Language Learning


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The Little Golden Calf stands alongside the works of Griboyedov, Pushkin, and Gogol for its profound effect on Russian language and culture. The novel overflows with trenchant catchphrases and legendary literary episodes, offering a portrait of Russian life that is as funny and true today as it was when the novel was first published. For decades, foreigners trying to understand Russia have been advised to read the adventures of Ostap.

[CALF * 448 pages * softcover * $20]

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The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience --reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar includes 62 of Krylov's tales, and presents them side-by-side in Russian and English (with poetic translations by Lydia Razran Stone), with original, whimsical color illustrations by Russian artist Katya Korobkina.

[KRYLOV * 148 pages * softcover * $25]

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Fish is a mesmerizing novel, from "one of Russia's finest prose writers." It traces the engrossing life journey of a selfless Russian everywoman in the wake of the Soviet collapse. "Prose of the highest calibre," wrote one critic, "you simply can't tear yourself away from this novel," said a second." Peter Aleshkovsky, author of a dozen books, has an unusual gift for description and that shimmers through in this brilliant new translation.

[FISH * 232 pages * softcover * $16]

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Survival Russian is an intensely practical guide to conversational, colloquial and culture-rich Russian that will deepen your understanding of Russian language and culture. …

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